Nav: Home

Cash and goal-setting help motivate heart patients to take healthy steps

June 13, 2018

DALLAS, June 13, 2018 -- The thought of losing up to $14 a week along with personalized goal setting may have motivated ischemic heart disease patients to increase their exercise, according to a new clinical trial published in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Yet, while regular exercise has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events and risk of death by up to 30 percent among these patients, most don't participate in exercise-based rehabilitation programs or obtain enough physical activity on their own.

"There is a lot of interest in using wearable devices to increase activity levels among high-risk cardiovascular patients, but the best way to design these types of programs is unknown," said Neel Chokshi, M.D., M.BA., first author and cardiologist at the Perelman School of Medicine and medical director of the Sports Cardiology and Fitness Program at Penn Medicine both located in Philadelphia. "Our trial is one of the first to test the use of mobile technology through a home-based program and found that while wearable devices alone were not effective, combining them with financial incentives and personalized goal-setting significantly increased physical activity levels during the 6-month period."

Researchers obtained baseline step counts and tracked 105 ischemic heart disease patients (average age 60; 70 percent men) for 24-weeks to see if financial incentives and personalized goal setting would increase physical activity. Patients in the incentive group received a wrist-worn activity tracking device, personalized step goals, daily feedback and were allocated $14 each week to a virtual account for the first 16 weeks - $2 of which could be lost per day for not achieving step goals. They also selected whether to receive personalized goal-setting communications by text, email, interactive voice recording or a combination.

Patients in the control group received a wearable device that counted steps but no incentives or feedback.

Researchers found:
  • Patients in the incentive group significantly increased their physical activity levels, 1,368 more steps per day during the main intervention period, compared to the control group.

  • After financial incentives were stopped in the follow up period, the incentive group still increased their physical activity by 1,154 steps per day compared to the control group.

  • Patients in the control group had no significant change in their physical activity levels.

"This is one of the first clinical trials that used financial incentives and found increases in physical activity were sustained even after incentives stopped, a potential sign of habit formation," said Mitesh Patel, M.D., senior author and assistant professor at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit, both located in Philadelphia. "A key element of our study was that incentives were designed to leverage the behavioral economic principle of loss aversion, which finds that for the same reward size, most people are more motivated when they are told they might lose a reward than when told they could earn a reward."
-end-
Other co-authors are Srinath Adusumalli, M.D.; Dylan S. Small, Ph.D.; Alexander Morris, B.S.; Jordyn Feingold, MAPP; Yoonhee P. Ha, M.Sc., M.Phil.; Marta D. Lynch, B.S.; Charles A. L. Rareshide, M.S.; and Victoria Hilbert, M.P.H., R.D. Author disclosures are in the manuscript.

The trial was funded by the National Center for Advancing Translational Science, the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics at the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Pennsylvania Health System through the Penn Medicine Nudge Unit. These funding sources had no role in the design and conduct of the study.

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association's policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke - the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation's oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

American Heart Association

Related Physical Activity Articles:

Physical activity may ward off heart damage
Physical activity can lower the risk of heart damage in middle-aged and older adults and reduce the levels of heart damage in people who are obese, according to research published today in JACC: Heart Failure.
How physical activity and sedentary time affect adolescents' bones
A large prospective study in 309 adolescent boys and girls underscores the importance of physical activity for developing bone strength during growth.
Few heart attack survivors get recommended physical activity
Researchers have found that only 16 percent of heart attack survivors get the recommended amount of physical activity in the weeks after hospitalization, despite evidence that physical activity reduces the risk of having a second heart attack.
Parents' physical activity associated with preschooler activity in underserved populations
Preschool-age children from low-income families are more likely to be physically active if parents increase activity and reduce sedentary behavior while wearing movement monitors (accelerometers), according to a Vanderbilt study published today in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
AMPK -- the enzyme that makes physical activity healthy
ampk Physical activity benefits diabetics and others with insulin resistance.
Physical activity good for your health, but what's happening below the surface?
The University of Michigan was recently awarded $8.2 million from the National Institutes of Health to investigate the molecular changes that occur during and after physical activity.
Psychological well-being and physical activity in older adults
In a paper just published by researchers at Chapman University, findings showed associations between psychological well-being and physical activity in adults ages 50 and older.
Parkinson's disease patients benefit from physical activity
A comprehensive review published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease confirms that people living with Parkinson's disease (PD) can benefit from being physically active, especially when it comes to improving gait and balance, and reducing risks of falls.
Research shows physical activity does not improve after hip replacement
New research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows that, surprisingly, patients' physical activity does not increase following hip replacement surgery.
The effectiveness of activity trackers and rewards to encourage physical activity
Activity trackers such as Fitbit, Jawbone, Garmin and others have become increasingly popular.

Related Physical Activity Reading:

Introduction to Kinesiology With Web Study Guide-4th Edition: Studying Physical Activity
by Shirl Hoffman (Editor)

Introduction to Kinesiology: Studying Physical Activity, Fourth Edition, is the most cohesive introduction to the field of kinesiology available, demonstrating how its many disciplines integrate into a unified body of knowledge. This all-inclusive approach gives students a solid background in the field and prepares them for further study and course work. This engaging and jargon-free text also introduces students to job prospects and areas of study and professional practice in kinesiology.

Introduction to Kinesiology, Fourth Edition, orients and prepares... View Details


Research Methods in Physical Activity-7th Edition
by Jerry Thomas (Author), Jack Nelson (Author), Stephen Silverman (Author)

Research Methods in Physical Activity, Seventh Edition, systematically guides students through the research process, introducing methods and tools specifically for kinesiology and exercise science disciplines, including the subdisciplines of physical therapy, rehabilitation, and occupational therapy. The seventh edition leads students and novice researchers to research competency with the distinctive humor that has become a trademark of this internationally recognized text.

This text provides step-by-step information for every aspect of the research process, from... View Details


Managing Organizations for Sport and Physical Activity: A Systems Perspective
by Packianathan Chelladurai (Author)

Managing Organizations for Sport and Physical Activity, fourth edition, presents a clear and concise treatment of managing organizations in sport and physical activity. The four functions of management--planning, organizing, leading, and evaluating--provide a general framework that represents the simplest and best approach for introducing readers to the intricacies of management. For each management function, Chelladurai presents relevant theories and their practical applications, citing those theoretical models that are most appropriate to the unique aspects of the sports... View Details


Promoting Physical Activity and Health in the Classroom
by Robert P. Pangrazi (Author), Aaron Beighle (Author), Deb Pangrazi (Author)

Promoting Physical Activity and Health in the Classroom  responds to the growing trend in K-6 education, where classroom teachers with no specific Physical Education training must increasingly implement activities in nontraditional settings—often with limited space, equipment, time, and planning. The book is colorful, engaging, compact, and user-friendly. Its practical organization, combined with detachable, sortable index-size cards comprising more than 260 separate activities, enables teachers to implement them immediately and provides a unique... View Details


Foundations of Physical Activity and Public Health
by Harold Kohl III (Author), Tinker Murray (Author)

Foundations of Physical Activity and Public Health is the first textbook to clearly define the intersection of kinesiology and public health. Authors Kohl and Murray, both leaders in the field, offer a solid introduction to the concepts of public health and kinesiology, the techniques used to measure physical activity, and the health effects of exercise and physical activity. The scientific findings and applications that led to the emergence of the field of physical activity and public health are also examined. Students will come away with a greater understanding of how experts... View Details


Introduction to Kinesiology 5th Edition With Web Study Guide: Studying Physical Activity
by Shirl Hoffman (Editor), Duane Knudson (Editor)

Introduction to Kinesiology: Studying Physical Activity, Fifth Edition With Web Study Guide, gives students a complete overview of the field of kinesiology and explores the common career paths, questions, and ideas that are part of this dynamic and expanding discipline. This engaging, four-color introductory text stimulates curiosity about the vast field of kinesiology, provides a foundation for students to build on through further study, and generates awareness of the long-standing and current issues that kinesiology professionals seek to understand and solve. Editors Shirl J.... View Details


Fun Games and Physical Activities to Help Heal Children Who Hurt: Get On Your Feet!
by Beth Powell (Author)

Develop children's brains and bonds with this collection of no-tech, physical games, strategies and activities. Ideal for children who have experienced neglect, abuse and trauma, these "real-world" experiences draw on therapeutic, trauma-focused-care play principles and promote positive attachment between child and caregivers.

Explanations for how and why specific play themes and caregiver attitudes can help children's brain development enhance the text. The book also shows how children learn to problem-solve real life situations by playing them out, finding workable solutions to... View Details


Preventing Sudden Death in Sport & Physical Activity
by Douglas J. Casa (Author), Rebecca L. Stearns (Author)

5 Stars! Doody's Review Service!
(1st Edition Review)

Preventing Sudden Death in Sport and Physical Activity, Second Edition examines the etiology, prevention, recognition, treatment, and return-to-play protocol of the common causes of sudden death in sport. Chapters are written by content area experts, offering a blend of clinical, scientific, and research expertise regarding each medical condition that is discussed.

Sudden death on the field is a growing concern in sports and physical activity. This groundbreaking text arms readers with the knowledge and skills they need to... View Details


Physical Activity and Health-2nd Edition
by Claude Bouchard (Editor), Steven N. Blair (Editor), William Haskell (Editor)

The human body is designed for activity. For most of our history, physical activity was required for survival, but technological advances have eliminated much of the need for hard physical labor. As our activity levels have dropped, it has become clear that a physically inactive lifestyle can lead to a host of health problems. Physical Activity and Health, Second Edition, provides a comprehensive treatment of the research on the benefits of a physically active lifestyle in comparison with the harmful consequences of physical inactivity.

Written by leading scientists... View Details


Emergency Management for Sport and Physical Activity
by Douglas J. Casa (Author), Rebecca L. Stearns (Author)

Includes Forward by National Football League Commissioner, Roger Goodell

Written by experts in the field, Emergency Management for Sport and Physical Activity is designed to educate non-Athletic Training majors on the ways in which to prevent sudden death during sport. Often these non-medical professionals are the first on the scene and must, at times, serve the vital role of first responder and immediately act on behalf of athletes' lives. Due to the rigorous training and conditioning programs that are being undertaken by athletes, effective emergency management has become a growing... View Details

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

The Person You Become
Over the course of our lives, we shed parts of our old selves, embrace new ones, and redefine who we are. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas about the experiences that shape the person we become. Guests include aerobatics pilot and public speaker Janine Shepherd, writers Roxane Gay and Taiye Selasi, activist Jackson Bird, and fashion executive Kaustav Dey.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#478 She Has Her Mother's Laugh
What does heredity really mean? Carl Zimmer would argue it's more than your genes along. In "She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Power, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity", Zimmer covers the history of genetics and what kinship and heredity really mean when we're discovering how to alter our own DNA, and, potentially, the DNA of our children.