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Periodontal cell sheet technique promotes bone and ligament formation on dental implant

June 13, 2018

New Rochelle, NY, June 11, 2018--Researchers used periodontal ligament (PDL)-derived stem cells to create a cell sheet, attached it to a titanium implant, and transplanted it into the mandibular bone of a dog, demonstrating the formation of a periodontal-like structure containing both cementum- and PDL-like tissue. The study, which shows the feasibility of combining a regenerative cell sheet with a titanium dental implant, is published in Tissue Engineering, Part A, peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Tissue Engineering website until July 11, 2018.

The article entitled "In Vivo Periodontium Formation Around Titanium Implants Using Periodontal Ligament Cell Sheet," describes the creation of a stem cell-containing cell sheet derived from a PDL. In the human mouth, the PDL helps protect against infection and the absorption of bone caused by mechanical stress. Coauthors Isao Ishikawa, DDS, PhD, Tokyo Women's Medical University (TWMU) and colleagues from TWMU and Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan and Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand documented the formation of cementum, a thin bony layer that attaches the teeth to the jaw.

"This truly innovative work combines traditional dental implants with stem cell sheet technology, thus creating a particularly relevant solution to a widespread problem in dental health care," says Tissue Engineering Co-Editor-in-Chief John P. Fisher, PhD, Fischell Family Distinguished Professor & Department Chair, and Director of the NIH Center for Engineering Complex Tissues at the University of Maryland, College Park.
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About the Journal

Tissue Engineering is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly online and in print in three parts: Part A, the flagship journal published 24 times per year; Part B: Reviews, published bimonthly, and Part C: Methods, published 12 times per year. Led by Co-Editors-in-Chief Antonios G. Mikos, PhD, Louis Calder Professor at Rice University, Houston, TX, and John P. Fisher, PhD, Fischell Family Distinguished Professor & Department Chair, and Director of the NIH Center for Engineering Complex Tissues at the University of Maryland, the Journal brings together scientific and medical experts in the fields of biomedical engineering, material science, molecular and cellular biology, and genetic engineering. Leadership of Tissue Engineering Parts B (Reviews) and Part C (Methods) is provided by Katja Schenke-Layland, PhD, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen and John A. Jansen, DDS, PhD, Radboud University, respectively. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed online at the Tissue Engineering website. Tissue Engineering is the official journal of the Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS). Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Tissue Engineering website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Stem Cells and Development, Human Gene Therapy, and Advances in Wound Care. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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