Nav: Home

Organic conditions boost flavonoids and antioxidant activity in onions

June 14, 2017

Five years ago, a highly publicized meta-analysis of more than 200 studies concluded that organic food was no more nutritious than conventionally grown food. Since then, however, additional work has suggested the organic foods contain more health-benefiting phytochemicals. Now, researchers have found that flavonoid levels and antioxidant activity in organic onions are higher than in conventional onions. Their investigation, in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, is the longest-running study to address the issue.

The authors propose that the conflicting results from previous research on organic and conventional crops' phytochemical content could be a function of short study periods and the exclusion of variables such as weather. To help address these factors, the researchers undertook a study from 2009 to 2014 of organic (per European Commission standards) and conventional "Red Baron" and "Hyskin" onions, which are rich in flavonoids such as quercetin. Some studies suggest that these flavonoids and others are beneficial for people with a range of health conditions.

Over the six-year study, measurements confirmed that weather could be a factor in flavonoid content, regardless of whether they were grown under organic conditions. For example, the levels of flavonols decreased in Red Baron onions from 2010, the year with the lowest temperatures, but increased in 2011 and 2014 when temperatures were higher and rainfall was down. The researchers also found that antioxidant activity was higher in both varieties of organic onions. And the flavonols in organic onions were up to 20 percent higher than in conventional ones.
-end-
The authors acknowledge funding from Teagasc , the Walsh Fellowship program and the Irish Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (FIRM 06/ 543 TNI/AFRC6).

The paper's abstract will be available on June 14 here: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jafc.7b01352.

The American Chemical Society is a not-for-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

Follow us: Twitter | Facebook

American Chemical Society

Related Flavonoids Articles:

The substance found in brown coal can help combat viruses
Scientists from Russia demonstrated a novel approach leveraging the combination of high-resolution mass spectrometry and chemoinformatics to identify biologically active molecular components of humic substances extracted from coal, and discovered substances with antiviral activity against the tick-borne encephalitis virus.
Apples, tea and moderation -- the 3 ingredients for a long life
Consuming flavonoid-rich items such as apples and tea protects against cancer and heart disease, particularly for smokers and heavy drinkers, according to new research.
Cytotoxicity and physical properties of glass ionomer cement containing flavonoids
At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Aline de Castilho, University of Campinas, Brazil, presented a poster on 'Cytotoxicity and Physical Properties of Glass Ionomer Cement Containing Flavonoids.'
Insect-deterring sorghum compounds may be eco-friendly pesticide
Compounds produced by sorghum plants to defend against insect feeding could be isolated, synthesized and used as a targeted, nontoxic insect deterrent, according to researchers who studied plant-insect interactions that included field, greenhouse and laboratory components.
The paper mulberry coevolved with soil microbes to humanity's benefit
The paper mulberry evolved its uniquely fibrous inner bark around 31 million years ago, long before the woody tree was first used for bookmaking during China's Tang dynasty.
Native California medicinal plant may hold promise for treating Alzheimer's
The medicinal powers of aspirin, digitalis, and the anti-malarial artemisinin all come from plants.
Phytochemistry, traditional uses and pharmacological profile of rose hip
The fruit of genus Rosa, known as 'rose hip,' is frequently used in different traditional medicines.
Flavonoids as P-gp inhibitors: A systematic review of SARs
This review concerned the recent updates on the structure-activity relationships of flavonoids as P-gp inhibitors, the molecular mechanisms of their action and their ability to overcome P-gp-mediated MDR in preclinical studies.
NTU scientists discover natural plant-based food preservative
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists have discovered a plant-based food preservative that is more effective than artificial preservatives.
An orange a day keeps macular degeneration away: 15-year study
A new study has shown that people who regularly eat oranges are less likely to develop macular degeneration than people who do not eat oranges.
More Flavonoids News and Flavonoids Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#541 Wayfinding
These days when we want to know where we are or how to get where we want to go, most of us will pull out a smart phone with a built-in GPS and map app. Some of us old timers might still use an old school paper map from time to time. But we didn't always used to lean so heavily on maps and technology, and in some remote places of the world some people still navigate and wayfind their way without the aid of these tools... and in some cases do better without them. This week, host Rachelle Saunders...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.