Nav: Home

Are portable music players associated with hearing loss in children?

June 14, 2018

BottomLine: The effect of portable music players on the hearing of children is unclear. A new study found that about 1 in 7 children (9 to 11 years of age) showed signs of noise-induced hearing impairment, prior to exposure to known noise hazards such as club and concert attendance. Portable music players, used by 40 percent of 2,075 children in the study from the Netherlands, were associated with high-frequency hearing loss. Repeated measurements are needed to confirm this association.

Authors: Carlijn M. P. le Clercq, M.D., Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and coauthors

To Learn More: The full study is available on the For The Media website.

Related material: The commentary, "Can Your Smartphone Save Your Hearing?," by Kevin H. Franck, Ph.D., M.B.A., C.C.C.-A., Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, Boston, is also available on the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2018.0646)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
-end-
Want to embed a link to this study in your story? Link will be live at the embargo time http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaotolaryngology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaoto.2018.0646

JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery

Related Hearing Articles:

Why you lose hearing for a while after listening to loud sounds
When we listen to loud sounds, our hearing may become impaired for a short time.
Older people who use hearing aids still report hearing challenges
A high proportion of older people with hearing aids, especially those with lower incomes, report having trouble hearing and difficulty accessing hearing care services, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
Hearing class
New study finds that the class of neurons responsible for transmitting information from the inner ear to the brain is composed of three molecularly distinct subtypes.
Hearing tests on wild whales
Scientists published the first hearing tests on a wild population of healthy marine mammals.
Genes critical for hearing identified
Fifty-two previously unidentified genes that are critical for hearing have been found by testing over 3,000 mouse genes.
Is your partner's hearing loss driving you mad?
New research by academics at the University of Nottingham has suggested that the impact of a person's hearing loss on their nearest and dearest should be considered when personalizing rehabilitation plans for patients with deafness.
No significant change seen in hearing loss among US teens
Although there was an increase in the percentage of US youth ages 12 to 19 reporting exposure to loud music through headphones from 1988-2010, researchers did not find significant changes in the prevalence of hearing loss among this group, according to a study published by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.
Certain OTC, less expensive hearing aids provide benefit similar to conventional hearing aid
A comparison between less-expensive, over-the-counter hearing assistance devices and a conventional hearing aid found that some of these devices were associated with improvements in hearing similar to the hearing aid, according to a study published by JAMA.
This fly's incredible hearing is a curiosity to those developing better hearing aids
U of T Scarborough biologists study fly to develop better hearing aids.
Gene may hold key to hearing recovery
Researchers have discovered that a protein implicated in human longevity may also play a role in restoring hearing after noise exposure.
More Hearing News and Hearing Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#541 Wayfinding
These days when we want to know where we are or how to get where we want to go, most of us will pull out a smart phone with a built-in GPS and map app. Some of us old timers might still use an old school paper map from time to time. But we didn't always used to lean so heavily on maps and technology, and in some remote places of the world some people still navigate and wayfind their way without the aid of these tools... and in some cases do better without them. This week, host Rachelle Saunders...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.