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American College of Physicians urges federal court to reject lawsuit seeking to overturn essential patient protections

June 14, 2018

Washington, DC (June 14, 2018) --The American College of Physicians (ACP), together with the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry have filed an amicus curiae (friend of the court) brief in the case of Texas vs. the United States. The College strongly opposes a lawsuit that would jeopardize key health care protections patients rely on that were put in place by the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

ACP is concerned that this case risks turning back the clock on federal health policy and that it would disregard several vital provisions of the ACA-- making it harder for patients to access care and for physicians to treat them. Should the case move forward, protections for patients with pre-existing conditions would be eliminated; annual and life-time dollar limits on coverage plans could be reinstated, negatively impacting patients who need it the most; and individuals under the age of 26 would no longer be eligible to be covered by their parents' health plans.

ACP has long advocated for changes to the nation's health care system that will make health care more affordable and accessible for all Americans. We fear that this case would do the opposite. Further, it would destabilize the insurance market and make it increasingly difficult for Americans to enroll in coverage plans that meet their needs.

The amicus brief that was submitted today aligns with ACP's longstanding advocacy goal of ensuring that the country's health care system protects and provides for patients rather than taking away much-needed protections and resources. ACP is ready to work with Congress and the administration to ensure that misguided health care policies are not put above the well-being of patients.
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About the American College of Physicians

The American College of Physicians is the largest medical specialty organization in the United States with members in more than 145 countries worldwide. ACP membership includes 152,000 internal medicine physicians (internists), related subspecialists, and medical students. Internal medicine physicians are specialists who apply scientific knowledge and clinical expertise to the diagnosis, treatment, and compassionate care of adults across the spectrum from health to complex illness. Follow ACP on Twitter and Facebook.

American College of Physicians

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