Nav: Home

Undersea fiber optics: A new way to detect quakes

June 14, 2018

Monitoring earthquake-induced changes in fiber optic cables on the ocean floor represents a new way to detect quakes, researchers say. Their approach - which would make it possible to sense temblors without installing new seafloor equipment - could permit detection of earthquakes in regions where seismic monitoring has otherwise been difficult, including in subduction zones or in remote ocean regions lacking seismometers. Even though 70% of the Earth's surface is covered with water, almost all seismic stations are on land. As a result, underwater earthquakes remain largely undetected, limiting scientists' ability to identify the source mechanisms of underwater seismic events. To date, scientists have recognized that existing optical fire cable networks - a backbone of international and intercontinental telecommunication - could help expand quake detection capabilities if the fibers therein were used as the sensing element. Now, Giuseppe Marra and colleagues report an approach by which to gauge quake-generated "disturbance" signals in oceanic fiber optic cables. The approach involves measuring so-called optical phase changes triggered in the fibers by seismic waves. It not only allows for earthquake wave detection, but for estimating quake magnitude and epicentral location, the authors say. In several evaluations of this approach involving earthquakes with epicenters in Italy, New Zealand, Japan and Mexico in recent years, Marra and colleagues demonstrated that their approach could effectively detect quake activity and parameters as well as local seismometers.
-end-


American Association for the Advancement of Science

Related Earthquakes Articles:

Distant earthquakes can cause underwater landslides
New research finds large earthquakes can trigger underwater landslides thousands of miles away, weeks or months after the quake occurs.
New model could help predict major earthquakes
Nagoya University-led researchers characterized several earthquakes that struck South America's west coast over the last 100 years by using seismographic data, tsunami recordings, and models of the rapid plate movements associated with these natural disasters.
Forecasting large earthquakes along the Wasatch Front, Utah
There is a 43 percent probability that the Wasatch Front region in Utah will experience at least one magnitude 6.75 or greater earthquake, and a 57 percent probability of at least one magnitude 6.0 earthquake, in the next 50 years, say researchers speaking at the 2017 Seismological Society of America's (SSA) Annual Meeting.
Anticipating hazards from fracking-induced earthquakes in Canada and US
As hydraulic fracturing operations expand in Canada and in some parts of the United States, researchers at the 2017 Seismological Society of America's (SSA) Annual Meeting are taking a closer look at ways to minimize hazards from the earthquakes triggered by those operations.
Oklahoma is laboratory for research on human-induced earthquakes
Earthquakes such as the February 2016 magnitude 5.1 Fairview quake, November 2016's 5.0 Cushing quake, and the September 2016 5.8 Pawnee quake -- the state's largest in historic times -- have made Oklahoma a laboratory for studying human-induced seismicity, according to researchers gathering at the 2017 Seismological Society of America's (SSA) Annual meeting.
Prediction of large earthquakes probability improved
As part of the 'Research in Collaborative Mathematics' project run by the Obra Social 'la Caixa', researchers of the Mathematics Research Centre (CRM) and the UAB have developed a mathematical law to explain the size distribution of earthquakes, even in the cases of large-scale earthquakes such as those which occurred in Sumatra (2004) and in Japan (2011).
Manmade earthquakes in Oklahoma on the decline
Stanford scientists predict that over the next few years, the rate of induced earthquake in Oklahoma will decrease significantly, but the possibility for damaging earthquakes to occur will remain high.
Crowdsourced data can help researchers study earthquakes
A new study on how people feel the effects of earthquakes illustrates the value that members of the public can add to the scientific research process.
Humans have been causing earthquakes in Texas since the 1920s
Earthquakes triggered by human activity have been happening in Texas since at least 1925, and they have been widespread throughout the state ever since, according to a new historical review of the evidence published online May 18 in Seismological Research Letters.
Bubble volcano: Shaking, popping by earthquakes may cause eruptions
A new study on the connection between earthquakes and volcanoes took its inspiration from old engineering basics.

Related Earthquakes Reading:

Earthquakes (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2)
by Dr. Franklyn M. Branley (Author), Megan Lloyd (Illustrator)

Earthquakes (Smithsonian-science)
by Seymour Simon (Author)

Earthquakes (True Books: Earth Science (Paperback))
by Ker Than (Author)

The Great Quake: How the Biggest Earthquake in North America Changed Our Understanding of the Planet
by Henry Fountain (Author)

Quakeland: On the Road to America's Next Devastating Earthquake
by Kathryn Miles (Author)

National Geographic Kids Everything Volcanoes and Earthquakes: Earthshaking photos, facts, and fun!
by Kathy Furgang (Author)

Earthquakes! (TIME FOR KIDS® Nonfiction Readers)
by Teacher Created Materials (Author)

Earthquakes: 2006 Centennial Update
by Bruce Bolt (Author)

Earthquakes: Geology and Weather (Science Readers)
by Teacher Created Materials (Author)

Earthquake! (Rise and Shine) (Natural Disasters)
by Marion Dane Bauer (Author), John Wallace (Illustrator)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Hacking The Law
We have a vision of justice as blind, impartial, and fair — but in reality, the law often fails those who need it most. This hour, TED speakers explore radical ways to change the legal system. Guests include lawyer and social justice advocate Robin Steinberg, animal rights lawyer Steven Wise, political activist Brett Hennig, and lawyer and social entrepreneur Vivek Maru.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#496 Anti-Intellectualism: Down With the Scientist!
This week we get to the bottom of anti-intellectualism. We'll be speaking with David Robson, senior journalist at BBC Future, about misology -- the hatred of reason and argument -- and how it may be connected to distrust of intellectuals. Then we'll speak with Bruno Takahashi, associate professor of environmental journalism and communication at Michigan State University, about how the way we consume media affects our scientific knowledge and how we feel about scientists and the press.