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Caesar's last breath and Einstein's lost fridge (video)

June 14, 2018

WASHINGTON, June 14, 2018 -- Are you breathing air molecules that were once exhaled by Caesar, Joan of Arc or Madame Curie? And why did Albert Einstein try to break into the refrigerator business? Writer Sam Kean, author of Caesar's Last Breath and The Disappearing Spoon, explains in this video, in which Reactions partners with PBS to find America's favorite book as part of the Great American Read: https://youtu.be/a4v5U4J373k.
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