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American Academy of Ophthalmology reiterates long-standing guidance on LASIK education

June 14, 2018

SAN FRANCISCO - June 14, 2018 - The American Academy of Ophthalmology, the world's leading professional association of eye physicians and surgeons, today reiterated its long-standing guidance for patients considering LASIK vision correction surgery.

The possible complications from this elective procedure have long been known but have nevertheless garnered recent attention in the national media.

"The risks of LASIK surgery are known to the ophthalmology community and have been studied consistently since the FDA approved the procedure 20 years ago," said Keith Carter, M.D., president of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. "More than 300 peer-reviewed studies have shown that on average 95 percent of patients were satisfied with their outcome after LASIK surgery. A small number of patients have substantial and persistent symptoms after LASIK. This is why ophthalmologists continue to evaluate patient satisfaction and continue to evolve the surgery to improve patient outcomes and to address patients with symptoms. While most patients are good candidates, LASIK is not for everyone. The Academy recommends patients talk with their ophthalmologist to understand the potential risks and to ensure they are a good candidate for surgery."

The Academy believes an informed patient is a better, more satisfied patient. To that end, the Academy provides extensive educational resources to both ophthalmologists and their patients, including:
  • The Academy partnered with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10 years ago to produce this patient guide to refractive surgery: Is LASIK For Me? A Patient's Guide to Refractive Surgery

  • The Academy's EyeSmart® program provides the public with the most trusted information about eye health, including vision correction surgeries such as LASIK: Questions to Ask When Considering LASIK
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About the American Academy of Ophthalmology

The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world's largest association of eye physicians and surgeons. A global community of 32,000 medical doctors, we protect sight and empower lives by setting the standards for ophthalmic education and advocating for our patients and the public. We innovate to advance our profession and to ensure the delivery of the highest-quality eye care. Our EyeSmart® program provides the public with the most trusted information about eye health. For more information, visit aao.org.

American Academy of Ophthalmology

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