Nav: Home

The challenges of North American specialty cut flowers

June 14, 2019

Across the United States and Canada, demand for local specialty cut flowers is increasing, and production has correspondingly jumped. To accurately assess the needs of the industry, John Dole, Cristian Loyola, and Rebecca Dunning electronically surveyed 1098 cut flower producers and handlers regarding their current cut flower production and postharvest problems and customer issues.

The illuminating results of their survey received careful analysis and are detailed in the article, "North American Specialty Cut Flower Production and Postharvest Survey," as found open access journal HortTechnology.

Cut flower production in the United States and Canada has increased in recent years. Due to this resurgence, more information is needed regarding current production and postharvest issues. This research effort and resulting article determined the nature of those issues and provides a guide for how to best address them using 31 major crop species as a template.

The article also listed an additional 99 cut flowers species and categories grown by enterprising local farmers.

Dole adds, "Local is in with consumers, and cut flower growers have responded by producing hundreds of different types of lush, gorgeous flowers. Our research showed that growers and cut flower handlers face a host of challenges in getting those flowers to their customers."

Of the 1098 surveys sent out, the authors received 210 responses, resulting in a 19% response rate. From that, cross -section data was extrapolated.

Analysis showed that the main perceived production problem was insect management. Crop timing proved to be the second-most important problem, and disease management was ranked third.

Crop timing encompasses a range of related issues, such as determining the correct harvest stage, harvest windows that are too short, flowering all at once, or lack of control when the crop is ready to harvest.

The main postharvest problems were temperature management, hydration, and flower food management. Regarding on-farm postharvest handling, hydration and vase life were the two most mentioned issues.

For postharvest during storage and transport, damage and hydration were the most commonly reported issues.

Customer complaints were also charted, with gauging vase life and petal shattering as the most-mentioned issues.

The survey proved revelatory in that it will allow researchers and businesses to focus on the major cut flower production and postharvest issues and on crops that are most in need of improvement in North America.
-end-
The complete article is available on the ASHS HortTechnology electronic journal web site: https://journals.ashs.org/horttech/view/journals/horttech/aop/article-10.21273-HORTTECH04270-19.xml. DOI: https://doi.org/10.21273/HORTTECH04270-19. Or you may contact John Dole of North Carolina State University at john_dole@ncsu.edu or call him at (919) 515-2614.

Founded in 1903, the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) is the largest organization dedicated to advancing all facets of horticulture research, education, and application. More information at ashs.org.

American Society for Horticultural Science

Related Disease Management Articles:

Contemporary management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, Radmila Lyubarova, Joshua Schulman-Marcus and William E.
Study finds 45 minutes of patient education improves chronic disease management
The Other 45 directed its efforts to an underserved community, noting the population's higher rates of chronic disease coupled with less exposure and access to accurate health information.
The surgical management of Ebstein anomaly
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp.
Asthma management: Allocating duties
Some examples of the persistence of incompletely resolved issues in asthma management are: 1) misdiagnosis -- with the related complex consequences --, especially in children population and, 2) poor control of the disease.
A holistic approach for mycetoma management
Mycetoma, a neglected tropical disease, can cause severe disfigurement and disability if not treated early.
Patient-centered medical home model improves chronic disease management
Data from more than 800 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) primary care clinics revealed that national implementation of a patient-centered medical home model was effective at improving several chronic disease outcomes over time.
What can cystatin C test contribute to chronic kidney disease management?
The use of cystatin C along with creatinine to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) when diagnosing chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care patients would result in increased health care costs and no improvement in risk prediction, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine by Adam Shardlow of the University of Nottingham, UK and colleagues.
ESC/EACTS Guidelines for the management of valvular heart disease published today
European Society of Cardiology (ESC) / European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) Guidelines for the management of valvular heart disease are published online today in European Heart Journal1 and on the ESC website.
Lessons from Ebola: New approach improves disease outbreak management
A new approach could quickly identify the most effective way to manage disease outbreaks -- an advance that could save lives.
Death by insulin -- management of self-harm and suicide in diabetes management
A special issue of Current Diabetes Reviews examining the management of diabetes in special populations: Death by Insulin -- Management of Self-Harm and Suicide in Diabetes Management.

Related Disease Management Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Crisis
There's no greater threat to humanity than climate change. What can we do to stop the worst consequences? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can save our planet and whether we can do it in time. Guests include climate activist Greta Thunberg, chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox, research scientist Sean Davis, food innovator Bruce Friedrich, and psychologist Per Espen Stoknes.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...