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Disaster Global Health: Respond, Recover, Prepare

June 15, 2016

Join over 400 attendees from ALL health professions as well as non-health individuals and organizations who play a major role in preparing for and responding to major events (natural disasters, conflict, technological). Emphasis will be on Disaster Global Health and individuals and nations coming together for more effective support of all elements of the disaster cycle.
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Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Related Natural Disasters Articles:

Natural disasters pose grave threat to planet's last Javan rhinos
The world's only population of Javan rhinoceros, already under severe threat from poaching, could go extinct in the future due to natural disasters, including volcanic eruptions and tsunamis.
Winemakers lose billions of dollars every year due to natural disasters
Every year, worldwide wine industry suffers losses of more than ten billion US dollars from damaged assets, production losses, and lost profits due to extreme weather events and natural disasters.
Research into why we remember some aviation disasters and forget others
Oxford University researchers have tracked how recent aircraft incidents or accidents trigger past events and how some are consistently more memorable than others.
Unpredictable disasters require new thinking
When the unthinkable happens and the unpredictable takes over, crises cannot be handled by the book.
Special issue on the forecast and evaluation of meteorological disasters
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences releases its latest issue (February 2017) on the Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters.
$4 million grant funds new UW RAPID facility to investigate natural disasters worldwide
A new disaster investigation center housed at the University of Washington and funded by a $4 million National Science Foundation grant will collect and analyze critical data that's often lost in the immediate aftermath of hurricanes and earthquakes but can help create more resilient communities.
Dull disasters?
In 'Dull Disasters?: How Planning Ahead Will Make a Difference,' authors Daniel J.
Social networks used in the assessment of damage caused by natural disasters
An international scientific study, involving Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), has carried research into the use of social networks such as Twitter, as tools for monitoring, assessing and even predicting levels of economic damage caused by natural disasters.
€1,000,000 multi-national project will reduce the impact of major natural disasters
A €1 million, multi-national project aimed at reducing the impact of disasters and boosting the ability of communities to recover from them is to be headed by the Global Disaster Resilience Centre based at the University of Huddersfield.
Ecotourism, natural resource conservation proposed as allies to protect natural landscapes
If environmentalists want to protect fragile ecosytems from landing in the hands of developers -- in the US and around the globe -- they should team up with ecotourists, according to a University of Georgia study published in the Journal of Ecotourism.

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