Nav: Home

Study examines facial fractures from recreational activity in adults 55 and older

June 15, 2017

Aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening activities are encouraged for older adults but there are implications for injury patterns and prevention.

Peter F. Svider, M.D., of the Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, and coauthors focused on adults 55 and older to estimate a national incidence of facial fractures that resulted from participating in recreational activities. Researchers used the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System to collect data on emergency department (ED) visits from 2011 through 2015 for patients in that age group who sustained facial fractures from recreational activities, according to a new study published by JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

During the study period, there were 20,519 ED visits for facial fractures associated with recreational activity among these adults. The annual incidence of facial fractures increased by 45.3 percent from 2011 (n=3,174) through 2015 (n=4,612), according to the study.

The most common causes of facial fractures were bicycling, team sports (i.e. baseball and softball), outdoor activities (i.e. hiking, fishing or camping) and gardening. Walking and jogging also were the cause of 5.5 percent of injuries. Many facial fractures were to the nose, followed by orbital fractures, the study indicates.

Men and women injured themselves differently. A greater proportion of men (35.7 percent) than women (14.9 percent) sustained facial fractures from bicycling, while a greater proportion of women than men (15.5 percent vs. 6.1 percent) sustained facial fractures while gardening, the results indicate.

Study limitations include that the database does not include patients who may have sought care in places other than the ED.

"Although injuries associated with more energetic and vigorous activities were more common overall, physicians should be aware that even activities characterized as having low risk such as gardening and walking still carry potential for trauma and facial fractures in this older patient population," the article concludes.
-end-
To read the full study, please visit the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jamafacial.2017.0332)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

The JAMA Network Journals

Related Walking Articles:

How walking benefits the brain
You probably know that walking does your body good, but it's not just your heart and muscles that benefit.
Cycling or walking to and from work linked to substantial health benefits
Active commuting by bicycle is associated with a substantial decrease in the risk of death from all causes, cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD), compared with non-active commuting by car or public transport, finds a study in The BMJ today.
Quality of life with those with advanced cancer improved through walking
Walking for just 30 minutes three times per week could improve the quality of life for those with advanced cancer, a new study published in the BMJ Open journal has found.
New walking app could make later life healthier and happier
'Walking for Well-Being', a prototype app that makes it easy to plan less difficult, less demanding walking routes, could help people to stay fit, active and independent as they get older.
Walking faster after stroke, managing chemobrain after cancer
New gate guidelines developed by Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute doubled stroke patients' walking speeds.
Regular walking regimen can improve heart health
Heart disease, the leading cause of death in America, can be combated by implementing a simple walking regimen.
Bariatric surgery associated with improved mobility, less walking pain
Does bariatric surgery for severely obese teens help them gain better mobility and reduce musculoskeletal pain?
First peek into the brain of a freely walking fruit fly
Researchers at the Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind at the University of California San Diego have developed a technique for imaging brain activity in a freely walking fruit fly.
Good news! You're likely burning more calories than you thought when you're walking
Leading standardized equations that predict the number of calories burned under level walking conditions are relatively inaccurate -- counting too few calories in 97 percent of cases, say researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas.
Anxiety can impact people's walking direction
People experiencing anxiety and inhibition have more activity in the right side of the brain, causing them to walk in a leftward trajectory.

Related Walking Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Bias And Perception
How does bias distort our thinking, our listening, our beliefs... and even our search results? How can we fight it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas about the unconscious biases that shape us. Guests include writer and broadcaster Yassmin Abdel-Magied, climatologist J. Marshall Shepherd, journalist Andreas Ekström, and experimental psychologist Tony Salvador.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#514 Arctic Energy (Rebroadcast)
This week we're looking at how alternative energy works in the arctic. We speak to Louie Azzolini and Linda Todd from the Arctic Energy Alliance, a non-profit helping communities reduce their energy usage and transition to more affordable and sustainable forms of energy. And the lessons they're learning along the way can help those of us further south.