Nanobiohybrids: A synergistic integration of bacteria and nanomaterials in cancer therapy

June 16, 2020

Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this mini review article the authors Yuhao Chen, Meng Du, Jinsui Yu, Lang Rao, Xiaoyuan Chen and Zhiyi Chen from The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Bethesda, MD, USA consider nanobiohybrids in cancer therapy.

Bacteria-based nanobiohybrids have the potential to provide a targeted and effective approach for cancer treatment. In this review, the authors summarize the development of nanomaterial-mediated cancer therapy. The mechanism and advantages of the bacteria in tumor therapy are described, focusing on different therapeutic strategies of nanobiohybrid systems which combine bacteria with nanomaterials in cancer therapy.

Cancer is a common cause of mortality in the world. For cancer treatment modalities such as chemotherapy, photothermal therapy and immunotherapy, the concentration of therapeutic agents in tumor tissue is the key factor which determines therapeutic efficiency. In view of this, developing targeted drug delivery systems are of great significance in selectively delivering drugs to tumor regions. Various types of nanomaterials have been widely used as drug carriers. However, the low tumor-targeting ability of nanomaterials limits their clinical application. It is difficult for nanomaterials to penetrate the tumor tissue through passive diffusion due to the elevated tumoral interstitial fluid pressure.

As a biological carrier, bacteria can specifically colonize and proliferate inside tumors and inhibit tumor growth, making it an ideal candidate as delivery vehicles. In addition, synthetic biology techniques have been applied to enable bacteria to controllably express various functional proteins and achieve targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. Nanobiohybrids constructed by the combination of bacteria and nanomaterials have an abundance of advantages, including tumor targeting ability, genetic modifiability, programmed product synthesis, and multimodal therapy. Nowadays, many different types of bacteria-based nanobiohybrids have been used in multiple targeted tumor therapies.
-end-
Article reference: Nanobiohybrids: A Synergistic Integration of Bacteria and Nanomaterials in Cancer Therapy, Y Chen, M Du, J Yu, L Rao, X Chen and Z Chen, BIO Integration, 2020, https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0008

BIO Integration is fully open access journal which will allow for the rapid dissemination of multidisciplinary views driving the progress of modern medicine.

As part of its mandate to help bring interesting work and knowledge from around the world to a wider audience, BIOI will actively support authors through open access publishing and through waiving author fees in its first years. Also, publication support for authors whose first language is not English will be offered in areas such as manuscript development, English language editing and artwork assistance.

BIOI is now open for submissions; articles can be submitted online at: https://bio-integration.org/bioiojs/index.php/bioi/login?source=%2Fbioiojs%2Findex.php%2Fbioi%2Fabout%2Fsubmissions

Please visit http://www.bio-integration.org to learn more about the journal.

Editorial Board: https://bio-integration.org/editorial-board/

BIOI is available on the IngentaConnect platform and at the BIO Integration website.

Submissions may be made using OJS .

There are no author submission or article processing fees.

Follow BIOI on Twitter @JournalBio; Facebook and LinkedIn.

ISSN 2712-0074
eISSN 2712-0082Keywords: BIO Integration; Bacteria, Cancer therapy, Nanocatalytic therapy, Nanomaterial, Targeted delivery.

Compuscript Ltd

Related Cancer Articles from Brightsurf:

New blood cancer treatment works by selectively interfering with cancer cell signalling
University of Alberta scientists have identified the mechanism of action behind a new type of precision cancer drug for blood cancers that is set for human trials, according to research published in Nature Communications.

UCI researchers uncover cancer cell vulnerabilities; may lead to better cancer therapies
A new University of California, Irvine-led study reveals a protein responsible for genetic changes resulting in a variety of cancers, may also be the key to more effective, targeted cancer therapy.

Breast cancer treatment costs highest among young women with metastic cancer
In a fight for their lives, young women, age 18-44, spend double the amount of older women to survive metastatic breast cancer, according to a large statewide study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Cancer mortality continues steady decline, driven by progress against lung cancer
The cancer death rate declined by 29% from 1991 to 2017, including a 2.2% drop from 2016 to 2017, the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality ever reported.

Stress in cervical cancer patients associated with higher risk of cancer-specific mortality
Psychological stress was associated with a higher risk of cancer-specific mortality in women diagnosed with cervical cancer.

Cancer-sniffing dogs 97% accurate in identifying lung cancer, according to study in JAOA
The next step will be to further fractionate the samples based on chemical and physical properties, presenting them back to the dogs until the specific biomarkers for each cancer are identified.

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers identify one way T cell function may fail in cancer
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism by which one type of immune cell, CD8+ T cells, can become dysfunctional, impeding its ability to seek and kill cancer cells.

More cancer survivors, fewer cancer specialists point to challenge in meeting care needs
An aging population, a growing number of cancer survivors, and a projected shortage of cancer care providers will result in a challenge in delivering the care for cancer survivors in the United States if systemic changes are not made.

New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment.

American Cancer Society outlines blueprint for cancer control in the 21st century
The American Cancer Society is outlining its vision for cancer control in the decades ahead in a series of articles that forms the basis of a national cancer control plan.

Read More: Cancer News and Cancer Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.