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Violence against women significantly more likely after high-risk sex

June 18, 2018

New Rochelle, NY, June 18, 2018--A study of the victimization of women who were living in areas of high poverty and HIV prevalence in multiple cities across the U.S. has shown that high-risk-sex, characterized by one or more HIV risk factors, was associated with a significantly greater likelihood of physical violence against the female participant within the subsequent 6 months. Detailed results of this study, its broader significance in light of the larger problem of violence against women, and implications of these findings for HIV prevention initiatives are discussed in an article published in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Women's Health website.

"HIV-Risk Characteristics Associated with Violence Against Women: A Longitudinal Study Among Women in the United States," was coauthored by Brooke Montgomery, PhD, MPH, Fay W. Boozman College of Public Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (Little Rock) and a team of researchers from Emory University School of Medicine (Atlanta, GA), Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University (Atlanta, GA), University of Washington (Seattle), Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (Seattle, WA), UNC School of Medicine and UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University (Washington, DC), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (Baltimore, MD), Columbia University School of Social Work (New York, NY), and West Virginia Clinical and Translational Science Institute (Morgantown).

In the accompanying editorial "Elevating Black Women in Contextually-Relevant Ways: A Top Priority in Violence and HIV Prevention Work," Amy Bonomi, PhD, MPH, Michigan State University (East Lansing) lauds the researchers for focusing primarily on black women (86% of the study population), noting that they "... have been historically under-represented in research and in larger societal conversations about violence against women."

"The findings by Montgomery, et al serve as an important call to action to prioritize black women in violence, sex risk, and HIV prevention programming across health care, public health, and broader societal settings, and to elevate their voices more broadly," states Dr. Bonomi.
-end-
Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UM1AI068619, UM1AI068617, UM1AI068613, KL2TR000063, UL1TR000039, UM1AI068619, UM1AI068617, UM1AI068613, 5U1AI069466. AI069423, RR025747, AI050410, 5UO1AI069418, P30AI050409, UL1RR025008, UM1AI06950307, U54GM104942, AI069465. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

About the Journal

Journal of Women's Health, published monthly, is a core multidisciplinary journal dedicated to the diseases and conditions that hold greater risk for or are more prevalent among women, as well as diseases that present differently in women. Led by Editor-in-Chief Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, VA, and President of the Academy of Women's Health, the Journal covers the latest advances and clinical applications of new diagnostic procedures and therapeutic protocols for the prevention and management of women's healthcare issues. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Journal of Women's Health website. Journal of Women's Health is the official journal of the Academy of Women's Health and the Society for Women's Health Research.

About the Academy

Academy of Women's Health is an interdisciplinary, international association of physicians, nurses, and other health professionals who work across the broad field of women's health, providing its members with up-to-date advances and options in clinical care that will enable the best outcomes for their women patients. The Academy's focus includes the dissemination of translational research and evidence-based practices for disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of women across the lifespan.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including LGBT Health, Transgender Health, Population Health Management, and Breastfeeding Medicine. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 140 Huguenot Street, New Rochelle, NY 10801 http://www.liebertpub.com Phone: (914) 740-2100 (800) M-LIEBERT Fax (914) 740-2101

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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