Journal announces scientific releases

June 19, 2003

WHAT: The American Society of Hematology (ASH) and editors of the scientific journal, Blood, are pleased to announce the first-ever availability of regular scientific releases, one to two every month, beginning July 2003.

Releases will focus on the latest findings from the scientific world, specifically on blood disorders, ranging from leukemia and lymphoma to sickle cell to stem cell research. These will be made available free to the media at EurekAlert!

Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology, is the most cited peer-reviewed publication in the field. All articles undergo rigorous peer review and are selected for publication on the basis of the originality and quality of the work described. As a special service to researchers and clinicians, accepted papers are made available online about three months ahead of print as "First Edition Papers." Blood is issued to Society members and other subscribers twice per month, available in print and online.

ASH, the world's largest professional society concerned with the causes and treatments of blood disorders, plays an active role in the development of hematology as a discipline. Its mission is to further the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disorders affecting blood, bone marrow, and the immunologic, hemostatic and vascular systems, by promoting research, clinical care, education, training, and advocacy in hematology.

WHERE: Available on-line at www.eurekalert.org

WHEN: Starting June 24, 2003

CONTACT: Aimee Frank
202-955-6222, x2527
afrank@spectrumscience.com

For more information about ASH, please call 202-776-0544, or visit www.hematology.org.
-end-


American Society of Hematology

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