Dividing up your holidays into several periods can help prevent post-holiday syndrome

June 19, 2007

Millions of people will leave their working places and start their holidays in the next weeks. The daily routine will be part of the past and resting days, pictures at the seashore and summer memories will be back to stay - at least for some weeks.

Experts estimate that 35 per cent of Spanish workers between the ages of 25 and 40 will have to face the "post-holiday syndrome" when they get back to routine: a general feeling of discomfort caused by the person's inability to adapt to work after finishing holidays.

Humbelina Robles Ortega, a researcher of the department of Personality, Assessment and Psychological Treatment of the University of Granada (Universidad de Granada), warns that getting back to routine can cause both physical and psychological symptoms. "Usually, when the post-holiday syndrome causes physical symptoms, it is nothing but the physical expression of psychological unease", she states. Tiredness, lack of appetite and concentration, drowsiness or sleeplessness, abnormally rapid heartbeat and muscular ache are just some of the physical symptoms of this illness. The psychological symptoms include irritability, anxiety, sadness, couldn't-care-less attitude and a deep feeling of emptiness.

According to professor Robles Ortega's advice, a good way of preventing this illness is to divide the holidays up into several periods, instead of taking the full period in one go: "If our holidays last one month and our employer allows us to do so, we could take fifteen days first and another fifteen days later on. This will prevent anxiety and we will be under the impression of a longer holiday period. Moreover, changes in habits won't be so radical and permanent and, therefore, re-starting work won't be so traumatic".

Apart from this, the UGR researcher recommends "to establish a period of re-adaptation" to work from holidays, for which "the best decision" is to get back home a few days earlier than to work. "Along these two or three days we should get back to our everyday habits or give up those adopted during holidays, such as going to bed later than usual or having some siesta sleep after lunch". The aim of this gradual return to daily life is "to prevent the re-start of work from being so traumatic".

Robles also recommends "not to attach too much importance" to this illness and to face the moment of getting back to work "as a new period full of other satisfying moments". The UGR researcher advises to plan trips and other pleasant activities all through the year, instead of doing so only in summer time. This way, she says, we will prevent "the feeling that work does not come with good moments", a feeling that is the main cause of post-holiday syndrome.
-end-
Reference

Prof. Humbelina Robles Ortega. Department of Personality, Assessment and Psychological Treatment, University of Granada. Tel.: +34 958 24 23 32 / +34 648 01 25 37. E-mail: hrobles@ugr.es.

University of Granada

Related Physical Symptoms Articles from Brightsurf:

Physical activity and sleep in adults with arthritis
A new study published in Arthritis Care & Research has examined patterns of 24-hour physical activity and sleep among patients with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and knee osteoarthritis.

Physical diseases can negatively affect a depression
Patients with a first-time depression diagnosis have an increased risk of the disease worsening and requiring hospitalisation, if they have previously been treated for a physical disease at a hospital.

Social isolation could cause physical inflammation
Social isolation could be associated with increased inflammation in the body new research from the University of Surrey and Brunel University London has found.

Integrating electronics onto physical prototypes
MIT researchers have invented a way to integrate 'breadboards' -- flat platforms widely used for electronics prototyping -- directly onto physical products.

The benefits of physical activity for older adults
New findings published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports reveal how physically active older adults benefit from reduced risks of early death, breast and prostate cancer, fractures, recurrent falls, functional limitations, cognitive decline, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and depression.

Russia's physical culture scene
Although a growing number of Russians now exercise regularly, the overall figure remains low -- only one-fourth of working women and less than one-third of working men are physically active.

Parkinson's symptoms improve with weekly regimens of both physical and cognitive exercises
Parkinson's patients' motor and non-motor symptoms were improved with a weekly exercise regimen that included physical and cognitive tasks, according to new research presented today (December 18, 2019) at The Physiological Society early career conference, Future Physiology 2019: Translating Cellular Mechanisms into Lifelong Health Strategies.

Is physical activity always good for the heart?
Physical activity is thought to be our greatest ally in the fight against cardiovascular disease.

Physical activity may attenuate menopause-associated atherogenic changes
Leisure-time physical activity is associated with a healthier blood lipid profile in menopausal women, but it doesn't seem to entirely offset the unfavorable lipid profile changes associated with the menopausal transition.

Are physical examinations really necessary?
As technology has gained ground in medicine and critics have called into question the diagnostic accuracy of physical examinations, what place does the practice of the physical exam have in today's clinic?

Read More: Physical Symptoms News and Physical Symptoms Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.