Nav: Home

NASA's Terra satellite sees Tropical Depression Carlotta weakening over Mexico

June 19, 2018

NASA Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Depression Carlotta as it was making landfall in southwestern Mexico where it weakened into a remnant low pressure area.

On June 18, the MODIS or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible light image of the storm.

At 11 p.m. EDT on June 18 (0300 UTC on June 19), the National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that Carlotta degenerated into a remnant low pressure area but was still producing heavy rainfall over southwestern Mexico. NHC issued the final advisory on Carlotta at that time, when it was centered near latitude 18.2 degrees north and longitude 103.6 degrees west. That was about 95 miles (150 km) west of Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico. Maximum sustained winds had decreased to near 25 mph (35 kph) with higher gusts. At that time, the post-tropical cyclone was crawling toward the northwest near 3 mph (6 kph).

On June 19, the Mexican Weather Service noted "Rains are forecast with intervals of showers for areas of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Sinaloa, Nayarit, Colima, Campeche and Quintana Roo," and isolated showers are possible in the states of Tabasco and Yucatán. These rains are the result of an area of low pressure from a tropical wave extending over the northeast of Mexico into the Gulf of Tehuantepec and the remnants of Carlotta, interacting another tropical wave. For updated forecasts, visit: http://smn.cna.gob.mx/es/.

Carlotta is expected to dissipate today, Tuesday, June 19.
-end-


NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Low Pressure Articles:

Angiotensin II shows promise in helping critically ill patients with low blood pressure
Sixty years after Cleveland Clinic researchers first isolated the role of angiotensin II in controlling blood pressure, a new international study led by Cleveland Clinic researchers shows that the compound can safely improve blood pressure among critically ill patients who are experiencing life-threatening hypotension, or low blood pressure.
Researchers advance low-cost, low-tech Zika virus surveillance tool
Using loop-mediated isothermal amplification, or LAMP, researchers found that they could easily detect Zika virus in human and mosquito samples from the United States, Brazil and Nicaragua.
Low-sodium diet might not lower blood pressure
A new study that followed more than 2,600 men and women for 16 years found that consuming less sodium wasn't associated with lower blood pressure.
Shortage of drug to treat low blood pressure from septic shock associated with increased deaths
Patients with septic shock admitted to hospitals affected by the 2011 shortage of the drug norepinephrine had a higher risk of in-hospital death, according to a study published online by JAMA.
Do you really have high blood pressure?
A study by researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) shows that more than half of family doctors in Canada are still using manual devices to measure blood pressure, a dated technology that often leads to misdiagnosis.
$9.4 million grant helps scientists explore how cell death from high blood pressure fuels even higher pressure
It's been known for decades that a bacterial infection can raise your blood pressure short term, but now scientists are putting together the pieces of how our own dying cells can fuel chronically high, destructive pressure.
Low-carb diets safe in short term, more effective for weight loss than low-fat diets
Mayo Clinic researchers analyzing more than a decade of research found people on low-carb diets lost between 2.5 to 8.8 more pounds than people on low-fat diets.
Doctors: Beware of low diastolic blood pressure when treating hypertension
By analyzing medical records gathered over three decades on more than 11,000 Americans participating in a federally funded study, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have more evidence that driving diastolic blood pressure too low is associated with damage to heart tissue.
Graphene under pressure
Small balloons made from one-atom-thick material graphene can withstand enormous pressures, much higher than those at the bottom of the deepest ocean, scientists at the University of Manchester report.
Putting the pressure on platinum
Hokkaido University researchers have synthesised a uniquely structured platinum-based superconducting material by applying extreme high pressure.

Related Low Pressure Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Moving Forward
When the life you've built slips out of your grasp, you're often told it's best to move on. But is that true? Instead of forgetting the past, TED speakers describe how we can move forward with it. Guests include writers Nora McInerny and Suleika Jaouad, and human rights advocate Lindy Lou Isonhood.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...