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NASA's Terra satellite sees Tropical Depression Carlotta weakening over Mexico

June 19, 2018

NASA Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Depression Carlotta as it was making landfall in southwestern Mexico where it weakened into a remnant low pressure area.

On June 18, the MODIS or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible light image of the storm.

At 11 p.m. EDT on June 18 (0300 UTC on June 19), the National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that Carlotta degenerated into a remnant low pressure area but was still producing heavy rainfall over southwestern Mexico. NHC issued the final advisory on Carlotta at that time, when it was centered near latitude 18.2 degrees north and longitude 103.6 degrees west. That was about 95 miles (150 km) west of Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico. Maximum sustained winds had decreased to near 25 mph (35 kph) with higher gusts. At that time, the post-tropical cyclone was crawling toward the northwest near 3 mph (6 kph).

On June 19, the Mexican Weather Service noted "Rains are forecast with intervals of showers for areas of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Sinaloa, Nayarit, Colima, Campeche and Quintana Roo," and isolated showers are possible in the states of Tabasco and Yucatán. These rains are the result of an area of low pressure from a tropical wave extending over the northeast of Mexico into the Gulf of Tehuantepec and the remnants of Carlotta, interacting another tropical wave. For updated forecasts, visit: http://smn.cna.gob.mx/es/.

Carlotta is expected to dissipate today, Tuesday, June 19.
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NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

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