SAGE partners with University of North Carolina Greensboro on SAGE Open

June 20, 2012

SAGE and the University of North Carolina Greensboro (UNC Greensboro) have announced a partnership designed to encourage social science and humanities faculty and students at the university to publish in SAGE Open. Launched by SAGE in 2011, SAGE Open is the first peer-reviewed, broad-based "Gold" open access social science and humanities journal.

UNC Greensboro will subsidize the author fee for 30 accepted papers to SAGE Open at a discounted rate. SAGE will reach out to UNC Greensboro faculty and students to let them know about the subsidized fees. Additionally, SAGE will handle the billing and accounting for the fees so that it is a seamless transaction for UNC Greensboro authors.

"As a major independent publisher for over fifty years, SAGE has contributed significantly to scholarly communication worldwide, and with SAGE Open, the company has moved boldly into an increasingly important realm of scholarly communication--gold open access publishing," said Rosann Bazirjian, Dean of University Libraries, University of North Carolina Greensboro. "The University Libraries at UNC Greensboro, which strongly support open access archiving and publishing, are proud to support our humanities and social science faculty in particular and gold open access publishing in general by partnering with SAGE in this new enterprise."

SAGE Open has had more than 1,100 submissions across a range of disciplines, including education, psychology, political science, management and communication. Papers are from universities from around the globe and include authors from leading institutions such as UNC Greensboro, Harvard, Stanford, NYU, and others.

"We couldn't be more pleased to be partnering with the University of North Carolina Greensboro," said Bob Howard, Executive Director, Journals Editorial. "This will certainly lead to expanded open access publishing by their social science and humanities scholars. Our partnership reinforces the message to them that open access is a viable outlet for their research output."
-end-
SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets. Since 1965, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students spanning a wide range of subject areas including business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology, and medicine. An independent company, SAGE has principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore and Washington DC. www.sagepublications.com

SAGE

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