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Low FODMAP diet and IBS recently published by Dove Medical Press

June 20, 2016

Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology has published the review "Efficacy of the low FODMAP diet for treating irritable bowel syndrome: the evidence to date".

As corresponding author Professor Richard Gearry says "Functional GI disease including IBS has had limited effective treatment options for many years. Whilst the symptoms can lead to a significant reduction in quality of life, patients usually like to avoid medications and prefer to use lifestyle approaches where possible. Low FODMAP diet is one of the few diets with a significant body of evidence supporting the efficacy of the diet and confirming the mechanism by which symptoms may be generated. However, the long term effects of such dietary manipulation are not well understood and need to be elucidated."

As Professor Andreas M Kaiser, Editor-in-Chief, explains "The authors provide an excellent overview of the association of FODMAP and irritable bowel syndrome."
-end-
Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology is an international, peer reviewed, open access, online journal publishing original research, reports, editorials, reviews, and commentaries on all aspects of gastroenterology in the clinic and laboratory.

Dove Medical Press Ltd is a privately held company specializing in the publication of Open Access peer-reviewed journals across the broad spectrum of science, technology and especially medicine.

Dove Medical Press

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