Nav: Home

Low FODMAP diet and IBS recently published by Dove Medical Press

June 20, 2016

Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology has published the review "Efficacy of the low FODMAP diet for treating irritable bowel syndrome: the evidence to date".

As corresponding author Professor Richard Gearry says "Functional GI disease including IBS has had limited effective treatment options for many years. Whilst the symptoms can lead to a significant reduction in quality of life, patients usually like to avoid medications and prefer to use lifestyle approaches where possible. Low FODMAP diet is one of the few diets with a significant body of evidence supporting the efficacy of the diet and confirming the mechanism by which symptoms may be generated. However, the long term effects of such dietary manipulation are not well understood and need to be elucidated."

As Professor Andreas M Kaiser, Editor-in-Chief, explains "The authors provide an excellent overview of the association of FODMAP and irritable bowel syndrome."
-end-
Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology is an international, peer reviewed, open access, online journal publishing original research, reports, editorials, reviews, and commentaries on all aspects of gastroenterology in the clinic and laboratory.

Dove Medical Press Ltd is a privately held company specializing in the publication of Open Access peer-reviewed journals across the broad spectrum of science, technology and especially medicine.

Dove Medical Press

Related Irritable Bowel Syndrome Articles:

Are steroids used too much for patients with inflammatory bowel disease?
Steroid therapy is commonly used to treat acute attacks of the inflammatory bowel diseases ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease; however, because it does not provide long-term benefits and it carries a risk of serious side effects, it should not be used to treat inflammatory bowel disease for more than three months.
New, noninvasive test for bowel diseases
Gut diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly prevalent worldwide, especially in industrialized countries.
HKBU discovers mechanisms underlying early life stress and irritable bowel syndrome
Researchers from Hong Kong Baptist University have found that the abnormal rise of a soluble protein called Nerve Growth Factor is a key factor linking early life stress to the development of irritable bowel syndrome.
Microbiome science may help doctors deliver more effective, personalized treatment to children with irritable bowel syndrome
To improve the treatment of children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), investigators have developed a sophisticated way to analyze the microbial and metabolic contents of the gut.
The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology: Hypnotherapy could help relieve irritable bowel syndrome symptoms
Peer-reviewed / Randomised Controlled Trial / People Gut-directed hypnotherapy delivered by psychologists appears as effective in group or individual sessions, potentially offering a new treatment option for irritable bowel syndrome in primary and secondary care
Early source of irritable bowel syndrome discovered
Michigan State University scientists have identified an early cause of intestinal inflammation, one of the first stages of inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, which afflict around 11 percent of the world's population.
Listening to gut noises could improve diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome
Utilizing newly adapted artificial intelligence, researchers have developed an acoustic belt that offers a new way to diagnose irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by listening to the noises in a patient's gut, according to research presented at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018.
Biomarkers for irritable bowel syndrome
Little is still known about the exact causes of irritable bowel syndrome.
Study reveals every bowel tumor and bowel cancer cell have unique genetic fingerprints
New research on bowel cancer has shown that every tumor is different, and that every cell within the tumor is genetically unique.
Smoking may cause inflammatory bowel disease
A new study shows for the first time a direct effect of cigarette smoke on bowel inflammation.
More Irritable Bowel Syndrome News and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#541 Wayfinding
These days when we want to know where we are or how to get where we want to go, most of us will pull out a smart phone with a built-in GPS and map app. Some of us old timers might still use an old school paper map from time to time. But we didn't always used to lean so heavily on maps and technology, and in some remote places of the world some people still navigate and wayfind their way without the aid of these tools... and in some cases do better without them. This week, host Rachelle Saunders...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.