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AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting begins Sunday

June 21, 2010

AcademyHealth's Annual Research Meeting (ARM), June 27-29 in Boston, convenes more than 2,300 researchers, policymakers and practitioners to discuss research addressing the critical challenges confronting the nation's health care delivery system, including the ways health services research (HSR) can inform current federal and state efforts to improve health care quality, reduce rising costs and expand access.

This year's meeting, held at the John B. Hynes Veterans Memorial Convention Center in Boston, focuses on the impact of HSR in national health reform. Keynote speaker Julie Rovner, correspondent with National Public Radio, has closely monitored the politics of health care throughout the recent reform debate and will share her perspective on the implications for HSR. Additionally, Atul Gawande, M.D., of Brigham and Women's Hospital, will discuss findings from his latest book and provide his insight into how HSR can improve clinical practice.

The ARM is the premier forum for health services research and the largest gathering of both experts and newcomers in the field. The meeting offers diverse research on more than 20 distinct areas of health services research and policy. More than half of the program is selected through blind peer-review.
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Registrations are accepted onsite, beginning Sunday, June 27 at 7:00 a.m.

You can follow the meeting on Twitter @academyhealth or #ARM2010.

AcademyHealth

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