Nav: Home

Noise reduction in motor boat cockpits and cabins possible

June 21, 2010

Boaters increasingly require convenience and quieter boats. Boating is unpleasant for the skipper and passengers if it is difficult to hear normal conversation in the cockpit. VTT's Quiet boats project examined both short-term solutions applicable to existing boats and factors affecting noise level that can be taken into account in the design of new boats.

The noise level of motor boat interiors can be affected - and reduced. Placing an acoustic enclosure around the engine and sealing any openings between the engine bay and the cockpit proved to be the most efficient 'quick fixes'.

The project has given boat makers access to practical research data on the origin of noise and ways of reducing it that can be directly applied to product development. Some of the companies involved in the project have already applied the results in their production. "Thanks to the results of the Quiet boats project these businesses now have a foundation on which to base their own further investigations and the product development of even quieter boats", says Senior Research Scientist Hannu Nykänen of VTT.

The study focused on cabin cruisers between 6 and 14 metres in length fitted with one or two sterndrive engines. The project began with the analysis of the noise levels, sound quality and intelligibility of speech in the cockpit and passenger cabin of the boat types selected as reference boats by the boatyards involved.

The project was carried out in cooperation with four Finnish boat sector companies: Bella Boats, Oy Botnia Marin Ab, Tristan Boats Ltd and Volvo Finland Ab. The University of Kuopio joined VTT in the research cooperation. The Quiet boats project is part of the Tekes Boat Programme 2007.
-end-


VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

Related Cooperation Articles:

International borders continue to hinder cross-border cooperation
Cross-border regions have great potential for cooperation, yet very few border regions are integrated, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.
As farming developed, so did cooperation -- and violence
The growth of agriculture led to unprecedented cooperation in human societies, a team of researchers, has found, but it also led to a spike in violence, an insight that offers lessons for the present.
Cooperation after eye contact: Gender matters
Researchers from the UB published an article in the journal Scientific Reports which analyses, through the prisoner's dilemma game, the willingness of people to cooperate when in pairs.
How employees' rankings disrupt cooperation and how managers can restore it
First prize is a Cadillac Eldorado, second prize a set of steak knives, third prize you're fired».
Exploring a strategy that leads to mutual cooperation without non-cooperative actions
A research team led by Hitoshi Yamamoto from Rissho University analyzed which strategies would be effective in the prisoner's dilemma game, into which a new behavior of not participating in the game was introduced.
Sex for cooperation
To understand the origins of human sociality studying the social dynamics of our closest relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos, is important.
Migration can promote or inhibit cooperation between individuals
A new mathematical analysis suggests that migration can generate patterns in the spatial distribution of individuals that promote cooperation and allow populations to thrive, in spite of the threat of exploitation.
How the brain 'mentalizes' cooperation
Researchers identify a part of the brain that helps execute cooperative tasks.
Getting a grip on human-robot cooperation
The study, published in Science Robotics, is a collaboration between The BioRobotics Institute (Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa, Italy) and the Australian Centre for Robotic Vision (Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia).
Ecstasy ingredient may promote cooperation
The recreational drug known as ecstasy or molly may help people regain trust in others after being betrayed, suggests results of a controlled laboratory study, published in JNeurosci, of healthy men given a pure form of the substance.
More Cooperation News and Cooperation Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Space
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren't. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60's, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.