Nav: Home

Small rodent species may become endangered

June 21, 2017

A small rodent called the hazel dormouse (Muscardinus avellanarius) is a European Protected Species and is monitored by volunteers at sites in England and Wales for the National Dormouse Monitoring Programme. A recent analysis of data from 400 UK sites between 1993 and 2014 found a 72% decline in dormice over this period, which amounts to an annual rate of decline of 5.8%.

The decline is ongoing and could mean that dormice are endangered in the UK, though the species is a top priority for conservation. "Dormice are declining despite strict protection and widespread efforts to conserve one of Britain's most endearing woodland mammals," said Cecily Goodwin, lead author of the Mammal Review study.

Dormice live in woodlands, scrub and hedgerows, and eat flowers, nuts and insects. Dormice are nocturnal and often sleep for much of the day, enabling dormouse monitors to make careful counts.

"Dormice face a range of problems: climate change and habitat loss are likely to be important, but we think that appropriate woodland management could make a big difference," said senior author Prof. Robbie McDonald.
-end-


Wiley

Related Species Articles:

Two new species of orchids discovered in Okinawa
Two new species of parasitic plants have been discovered on the main island of Okinawa, Japan, and named Gastrodia nipponicoides and Gastrodia okinawensis.
Cornering endangered species
Geographic areas occupied by certain species shrink as they decline in abundance, leaving them more vulnerable to extinction by harvest.
New species of Brazilian copepod suggests ancient species diversification and distribution
A new species and genus of a tiny freshwater copepod has been found in the Brazilian rocky savannas, an ecosystem under heavy anthropogenic pressure.
Redefining 'species'
What is a species? Biologists -- and ornithologists in particular -- have been debating the best definition for a very long time.
New species discovered in Antarctica
A team of Japanese scientists has discovered a new species of polychaete, a type of marine annelid worm, 9-meters deep underwater near Japan's Syowa Station in Antarctica, providing a good opportunity to study how animals adapt to extreme environments.
Genomic tools for species discovery inflate estimates of species numbers, U-Michigan biologists contend
Increasingly popular techniques that infer species boundaries in animals and plants solely by analyzing genetic differences are flawed and can lead to inflated diversity estimates, according to a new study from two University of Michigan evolutionary biologists.
Common US snake actually 3 different species
New research reveals that a snake found across a huge swath of the Eastern United States is actually three different species.
The origins of Cuban species
An international research team suggests the endangered Cuban solenodon evolved after the extinction of dinosaurs.
New rare species of whale identified
Researchers have identified a new rare species of beaked whale with a range in the remote North Pacific Ocean.
Unusual new zoantharian species is the first described solitary species in over 100 years
A very unusual new species of zoantharian was discovered by two researchers in Okinawa.

Related Species Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?
At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away? In this live panel at Awesome Con we bring in science writer Tina Saey to talk about all her DNA testing, and bioethicist Debra Mathews, to determine whether Tina should have done it at all. Related links: What FamilyTreeDNA sharing genetic data with police means for you Crime solvers embraced...