Nav: Home

Could handheld electronic devices contribute to carpal tunnel syndrome?

June 21, 2017

In a study of 48 university students, intensive users of electronic devices reported more wrist/hand pain than non-intensive users.

Intensive users also showed signs of effects on the median nerve within the carpal tunnel and the transverse carpal ligament, resulting in numbness, tingling, and pain in the hand.

The findings indicate that caution may be warranted when using handheld electronic devices, in order to minimize the chance of developing carpal tunnel syndrome.

"Our prior work identified that out of 500 students, 54% (245/451) of intensive users and 12% (6/49) of non-intensive users reported musculoskeletal symptoms in relation to use of electronic devices. We randomly selected 48 students using stratified sampling from the intensive and non-intensive users for further investigation and our results showed that excessive use of electronic devices may be linked to a greater risk of developing carpal tunnel syndrome," said Dr. Peter White, co-author of the Muscle & Nerve study. "Therefore, vigilance in educating and monitoring young people using electronic devices is important, especially children and adolescents as they are less capable of self-regulating."
-end-


Wiley

Related Pain Articles:

It's not just a pain in the head -- facial pain can be a symptom of headaches too
A new study finds that up to 10% of people with headaches also have facial pain.
New opioid speeds up recovery without increasing pain sensitivity or risk of chronic pain
A new type of non-addictive opioid developed by researchers at Tulane University and the Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System accelerates recovery time from pain compared to morphine without increasing pain sensitivity, according to a new study published in the Journal of Neuroinflammation.
The insular cortex processes pain and drives learning from pain
Neuroscientists at EPFL have discovered an area of the brain, the insular cortex, that processes painful experiences and thereby drives learning from aversive events.
Pain, pain go away: new tools improve students' experience of school-based vaccines
Researchers at the University of Toronto and The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) have teamed up with educators, public health practitioners and grade seven students in Ontario to develop and implement a new approach to delivering school-based vaccines that improves student experience.
Pain sensitization increases risk of persistent knee pain
Becoming more sensitive to pain, or pain sensitization, is an important risk factor for developing persistent knee pain in osteoarthritis (OA), according to a new study by researchers from the Université de Montréal (UdeM) School of Rehabilitation and Hôpital Maisonneuve Rosemont Research Centre (CRHMR) in collaboration with researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM).
More Pain News and Pain Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...