Nav: Home

New flood study reveals America's most vulnerable communities

June 21, 2017

Floods are the natural disaster that kill the most people. They are also the most common natural disaster. As the threat of flooding increases worldwide, a group of scientists at LSU have gathered valuable information on flood hazard, exposure and vulnerability in counties throughout the U.S. They studied development trends from 2001 to 2011 and found that urban development has declined in coastal flood zones in general across the U.S. However, development in flood zones in inland counties has grown. These results and more have been published in the Annals of the American Association of Geographers.

"We found more urban development in the inland flood zones than the coastal areas between 2000-2011, which is a worrisome trend. The implications are that people living in the coastal zone want to migrate inland, but don't realize they are still vulnerable if they live in the flood zones in inland areas," said Nina Lam, LSU professor of Environmental Sciences in College of the Coast & Environment and co-author of the study.

This alarming trend may point to a need for more awareness, education and communication about flood risk in inland counties, said the researchers. More affordable housing in non-flood zones and strategies to mitigate floods are also needed inland.

"The results show that people in coastal areas are more aware of flood threats than those living in inland flood zones, and that populations in inland areas are increasing. This information could aid future flood-planning efforts in inland communities," said Judy Skog, a director of the National Science Foundation's Coastal SEES, or NSF's sustainability program, which co-funded the research.

The researchers compiled urban development, flood hazard and census data and overlaid it on a map of the U.S. Although their analysis shows that Americans in general have become more aware of the risk of floods over the 10-year study period, the researchers identified several U.S. hot spots where urban development has grown in coastal flood zones including New York City and Miami.

The three counties in the U.S. that have the largest concentration of people living in a flood zone are located on the Gulf of Mexico. Cameron parish in Louisiana has 93.6 percent of its 6,401 population living in the flood zone, Monroe county in Florida has 91.4 percent of its 66,804 population and Galveston county in Texas has 82.8 percent of its 241,204 population living in a flood zone.

"This nationwide study of flood zones, human populations and urban development provides a tool that could be used globally," Skog said.

Climate change, land subsidence and new levees and dams will change long-term flood exposure. Therefore, the accuracy of flood maps must be investigated.

"Flooding is the most common and widespread disaster we face nationally, and the one that is the easiest to alleviate by effective planning," said Richard Yuretich, a director of NSF's Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems, or CNH program, which co-funded the research. "This study provides important data on flood hazards across the country, and demonstrates that the research and education about floods that has been done over the past decade has helped manage risk. Yet there are still places where people are in harm's way."
-end-
This study was funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation grants CNH 121211 and Coastal SEES 1427389.

Louisiana State University

Related Research Articles:


Related Research Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?
At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away? In this live panel at Awesome Con we bring in science writer Tina Saey to talk about all her DNA testing, and bioethicist Debra Mathews, to determine whether Tina should have done it at all. Related links: What FamilyTreeDNA sharing genetic data with police means for you Crime solvers embraced...