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This week from AGU: Remarkable 2016 storms caused massive Antarctic sea ice loss

June 21, 2017

GeoSpace

Extraordinary storms caused massive Antarctic sea ice loss in 2016

A series of unprecedented storms over the Southern Ocean likely caused the most dramatic decline in Antarctic sea ice seen to date, a new study in Geophysical Research Letters finds.

The Landslide Blog

Much more detail about the Greenland landslide and tsunami, including images and video

In the last 24 hours much more detail has emerged about the Greenland landslide and tsunami, which severely damaged the settlement of Nuugaatsiaq on Saturday, June 17.

Eos.org

Growing more with less using cell phones and satellite data

Text messages backed by satellite data tell farmers in Pakistan how much to irrigate, helping them to conserve water and boost crop yields.

Climate and other models may be more accurate than reported

Current error analysis methods for climate models involve calculations that erratically overestimate average model error, a group of scientists contends. Instead, they propose a different approach.

Research Spotlights

Mysterious particle beams found over jupiter's poles

Revealed by NASA's Juno spacecraft, a new study in Geophysical Research Letters suggests that the processes that produce Jupiter's auroras are unlike those on Earth.

Deforestation effects as different as night and day

A new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences investigates how deforestation can cause different land surface temperature effects depending on the time of day.

What makes the biggest cycle in tropical weather tick?

The Madden-Julian Oscillation drives storms across the Indian and Pacific oceans every 30 to 60 days. A new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres suggests that clouds absorbing and reemitting radiative energy play a key role.
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American Geophysical Union

Related Tsunami Articles:

Japanese slow earthquakes could shed light on tsunami generation
Understanding slow-slip earthquakes in subduction zone areas may help researchers understand large earthquakes and the creation of tsunamis, according to an international team of researchers that used data from instruments placed on the seafloor and in boreholes east of the Japanese coast.
New evidence reveals source of 1586 Sanriku, Japan tsunami
A team of researchers, led by Dr. Rhett Butler, geophysicist at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UHM), re-examined historical evidence around the Pacific and discovered the origin of the tsunami that hit Sanriku, Japan in 1586 -- a mega-earthquake from the Aleutian Islands that broadly impacted the north Pacific.
Study models Tsunami Risk for Florida and Cuba
While the Caribbean is not thought to be at risk for tsunamis, a new study by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science indicates that large submarine landslides on the slopes of the Great Bahama Bank have generated tsunamis in the past and could potentially again in the future.
'Space tsunami' causes the third Van Allen Belt
Earth's magnetosphere, the region of space dominated by Earth's magnetic field, protects our planet from the harsh battering of the solar wind.
Ancient tsunami evidence on Mars reveals life potential
The geologic shape of what were once shorelines through Mars' northern plains convinces scientists that two large meteorites -- hitting the planet millions of years apart -- triggered a pair of mega-tsunamis.
Preparations for a US west coast tsunami look to the past and future
Plans for managing tsunami risk on the West Coast are evolving, said scientists speaking at the Seismological Society of America's 2016 Annual Meeting, held April 20-22 in Reno, Nevada.
EARTH: Revealing potential tsunami inundation on California coast
Given new information about the capability of faults to produce stronger earthquakes than previously thought, researchers at the University of California Riverside wondered if the current tsunami hazard maps for California adequately predict inundation zones.
AGU: Better, faster tsunami warnings possible with GPS
Better, faster tsunami warnings are possible with GPS.
What would a tsunami in the Mediterranean look like?
A team of European researchers have developed a model to simulate the impact of tsunamis generated by earthquakes and applied it to the Eastern Mediterranean.
Study outlines impact of tsunami on the Columbia River
Engineers at Oregon State University have completed one of the most precise evaluations yet done about the impact of a major tsunami event on the Columbia River, what forces are most important in controlling water flow and what areas might be inundated.

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