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This week from AGU: Remarkable 2016 storms caused massive Antarctic sea ice loss

June 21, 2017

GeoSpace

Extraordinary storms caused massive Antarctic sea ice loss in 2016

A series of unprecedented storms over the Southern Ocean likely caused the most dramatic decline in Antarctic sea ice seen to date, a new study in Geophysical Research Letters finds.

The Landslide Blog

Much more detail about the Greenland landslide and tsunami, including images and video

In the last 24 hours much more detail has emerged about the Greenland landslide and tsunami, which severely damaged the settlement of Nuugaatsiaq on Saturday, June 17.

Eos.org

Growing more with less using cell phones and satellite data

Text messages backed by satellite data tell farmers in Pakistan how much to irrigate, helping them to conserve water and boost crop yields.

Climate and other models may be more accurate than reported

Current error analysis methods for climate models involve calculations that erratically overestimate average model error, a group of scientists contends. Instead, they propose a different approach.

Research Spotlights

Mysterious particle beams found over jupiter's poles

Revealed by NASA's Juno spacecraft, a new study in Geophysical Research Letters suggests that the processes that produce Jupiter's auroras are unlike those on Earth.

Deforestation effects as different as night and day

A new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences investigates how deforestation can cause different land surface temperature effects depending on the time of day.

What makes the biggest cycle in tropical weather tick?

The Madden-Julian Oscillation drives storms across the Indian and Pacific oceans every 30 to 60 days. A new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres suggests that clouds absorbing and reemitting radiative energy play a key role.
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American Geophysical Union

Related Tsunami Articles:

'Tsunami' on a silicon chip: a world first for light waves
A collaboration between the University of Sydney Nano Institute and Singapore University of Technology and Design has for the first time manipulated a light wave, or photonic information, on a silicon chip that retains its overall 'shape'.
Tsunami signals to measure glacier calving in Greenland
Scientists have employed a new method utilizing tsunami signals to calculate the calving magnitude of an ocean-terminating glacier in northwestern Greenland, uncovering correlations between calving flux and environmental factors such as air temperature, ice speed, and ocean tides.
Salish seafloor mapping identifies earthquake and tsunami risks
The central Salish Sea of the Pacific Northwest is bounded by two active fault zones that could trigger rockfalls and slumps of sediment that might lead to tsunamis, according to a presentation at the 2019 SSA Annual Meeting.
Heading towards a tsunami of light
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have proposed a way to create a completely new source of radiation.
Paradigm shift needed for designing tsunami-resistant bridges
Researchers argue in a new study that a paradigm shift is needed for assessing bridges' tsunami risk.
How large can a tsunami be in the Caribbean?
The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami has researchers reevaluating whether a magnitude 9.0 megathrust earthquake and resulting tsunami might also be a likely risk for the Caribbean region, seismologists reported at the SSA 2018 Annual Meeting.
Preparing for the 'silver tsunami'
Case Western Reserve University law professor suggests how to address nation's looming health-care and economic crisis caused by surging baby-boom population.
Modeling future earthquake and tsunami risk in southeast Japan
Geoscience researchers at UMass Amherst, Smith College and the Japanese Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology unveil new, GPS-based methods for modeling earthquake-induced tsunamis for southeast Japan along the Nankai Trough.
Could underwater sound waves be the key to early tsunami warnings?
Mathematicians have devised a way of calculating the size of a tsunami and its destructive force well in advance of it making landfall by measuring fast-moving underwater sound waves, opening up the possibility of a real-time early warning system.
6,000-year-old skull could be from the world's earliest known tsunami victim
Scientists have discovered what they believe is the skull of the earliest known tsunami victim, a person who lived 6,000 years ago in Papua New Guinea.
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