Nav: Home

Many wildlife-vehicle collisions preventable

June 21, 2018

A new study from the University of Waterloo has found that Ontario could save millions by implementing simple measures to help prevent vehicle accidents involving wildlife.

The Waterloo study focused on Ontario. It concluded that many of the thousands of wildlife-vehicle collisions -- some fatal -- occurring each year could be prevented if authorities implemented a few, cost-effective strategies to minimize the occurrences.

Implementing strategies such as better signage, wildlife detection systems, fencing and wildlife crossings could help reduce financial and health-related impacts for people, emergency services and the insurance industry. The measures could also help prevent unnecessary loss in the wildlife populations.

"These collisions cost Canadians hundreds of millions a year in vehicle damage and medical costs, as well as traffic delays, emergency services use and increases in insurance premiums," said Waterloo's Associate Professor Michael Drescher, who co-authored the study with graduate student Kristin Elton. "Ontario is missing an opportunity here. The most efficient way to prevent these accidents is to integrate effective measures in wildlife conflict zones every time major road work is undertaken."

The study looked specifically at Southern Ontario, which has the highest concentration of roads in Canada. With ever-expanding infrastructure having a significant impact on wildlife and their habitat, many of the cost-effective measures that could help reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions are underdeveloped in Ontario.

"Within Canada, the Rocky Mountain region is renowned as a leader in the management of wildlife-road conflicts, said Drescher, who estimates five to 10 per cent of car insurance premiums go to animal-related incidents. "They've realized the economics are simple. Adding measures to road construction projects only marginally impacts the overall budget, while saving millions in taxpayer money, insurance costs, and potentially lives.

"Governments have to balance many competing factors next with the technical elements of this problem, such as perceived financial constraints, public opinion and political motivations," added Drescher. "When these factors are not managed right, wildlife management measures are delayed or never started."
-end-
The study, Implementing wildlife-management strategies into road infrastructure in southern Ontario: a critical success factors approach, was published recently in the Journal of Environmental Planning and Management.

University of Waterloo

Related Emergency Services Articles:

US emergency medical services underrepresented of women and minorities
Women and minority groups are underrepresented in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in the US and workforce diversity is not likely undergo big changes anytime soon, according to a new 10-year study of almost 700,000 newly certified emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics, published in Prehospital Emergency Care.
Ridehailing services may be driving up traffic deaths
The arrival of ridehailing is associated with an increase of approximately 3 percent in the number of motor vehicle fatalities and fatal accidents, according to research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.
Studies examine pediatric services in US emergency departments
Three papers from research teams led by a Massachusetts General Hospital physician examine the current readiness of US emergency departments (EDs) to care for children and describe an initiative that led to the appointment of a Pediatric Emergency Care Coordinator -- a step considered the single best intervention to improve pediatric emergency care -- in all Massachusetts EDs.
Use of VA services impacted by external economic, policy changes
A new study has found that use of VA services is affected by economic and policy changes outside the VA, such as Medicaid eligibility, private employer insurance coverage, unemployment and (non-VA) physician availability.
Women more likely to use other preventive health services after mammography
Medicare beneficiaries who undergo breast cancer screening with mammography are more likely than unscreened women to undergo other preventive health services like screening for cervical cancer and osteoporosis, according to a major new study.
More Emergency Services News and Emergency Services Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...