Nav: Home

Antidiabetic action of natural fatty acid derivatives not confirmed

June 21, 2018

A research consortium between the healthcare company Sanofi and Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) investigated the antidiabetic action of certain natural fatty acids, so-called FAHFAs, which US-American scientists had reported in 2014. For some of these compounds, e.g. 5-PAHSA and 9-PAHSA, elevated levels were found in mice which overexpressed the glucose transporter Glut4. This transporter is controlled by insulin and causes the uptake of blood glucose in particular into muscle cells. It had been reported that both PAHSA isomers occur in food and are also produced by human cells. Diabetics have lower blood levels of these compounds than healthy individuals. When mice were fed with a FAHFA-enriched diet, their blood glucose levels were found to decrease and insulin was released.

These results published in a prominent journal caused a stir among scientists as they suggested a new point of attack in the fight against a widespread disease. Chemists under guidance of Professor Till Opatz from Mainz University synthesized the stereoisomers of 5- and 9-PAHSA and sent them to their colleagues at Sanofi in Frankfurt for biological testing. In some of the tests, rudimentary metabolic changes could be detected but the overall effect of the compounds was sobering: none of these molecules was able to achieve positive effects on clearly defined endpoints in metabolism.

The results of the researchers from Frankfurt and Mainz recently appeared in Cell Metabolism, a highly renowned international scientific journal. Now the German scientists hope for a constructive discussion on the discrepancy between both studies resulting in a better understanding of the disease models.

The current publication demonstrates the successful collaboration between a university and a research-active healthcare company in a highly relevant area of basic research in biomedicine. It underlines the importance of verification of scientific results and their disclosure.
-end-
Publication:

E. Pflimlin et al., Acute and repeated treatment with 5- or 9-PAHSA isomers does not improve glucose control in mice
Cell Metabolism, June 21, 2018
DOI: 10.1016/j.cmet.2018.05.028
https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(18)30381-4

Further Links:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2014.09.035 - Discovery of a Class of Endogenous Mammalian Lipids with Anti-Diabetic and Anti-inflammatory Effects, Cell, 09 October 2014

Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz

Related Blood Glucose Articles:

Researchers identify unique glucose-sensing neurons that regulate blood sugar
At Baylor College of Medicine and other institutions, researchers have identified a group of unique glucose-sensing neurons in the brain and how they work together to prevent severe hypoglycemia in mice.
New study links severe sleep apnea to higher blood glucose levels in African-Americans
African-Americans with severe sleep apnea and other adverse sleep patterns are much more likely to have high blood glucose levels -- a risk factor for diabetes -- than those without these patterns, according to a new study funded in part by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health.
Small rises in blood glucose trigger big changes in insulin-producing cells
This study provides a wealth of new data showing how beta cells behave at slightly raised levels of blood glucose -- still within the pre-diabetes range.
High blood glucose levels may explain why some flu patients experience severe symptoms
Influenza A (a highly contagious virus that causes annual flu epidemics worldwide) may trigger an inflammatory 'cytokine storm' -- an excessive immune response that can lead to hospitalization or even death -- by increasing glucose metabolism, according to a new study.
Loss of gland in eyelids may be a biomarker for elevated blood glucose in diabetes
In patients with diabetes, loss of the gland that helps lubricate the eye may be a sign of elevated blood glucose levels, according to research accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting.
Medtronic MiniMed 670G insulin pump allows 'excellent' blood glucose control
Patients with type 1 diabetes who use Medtronic's MiniMedTM 670G insulin pump system are able to maintain blood glucose levels in the targeted range over 71% of the time, according to a study that analyzed some 6 million days of real-world data.
'Revita' improves blood glucose levels, liver metabolic health in type 2 diabetes
Patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes who underwent a novel, minimally invasive, endoscopic procedure called Revita® duodenal mucosal resurfacing (DMR) had significantly improved blood glucose (sugar) levels, liver insulin sensitivity, and other metabolic measures three months later, according to new data from the REVITA-2 study.
Artificial pancreas system better controls blood glucose levels than current technology
Study based at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and other centers finds new system has safety, efficacy benefits for people with type 1 diabetes
New study sheds light on how blood vessel damage from high glucose concentrations unfolds
A mechanism in the cells that line our blood vessels that helps them to process glucose becomes uncontrolled in diabetes, and could be linked to the formation of blood clots and inflammation according to researchers from the University of Warwick.
Blood pressure and glucose control may prevent common arrhythmia
Blood-pressure and glucose control may be effective in preventing heart block, a common form of arrhythmia, and the subsequent need for a pacemaker, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.
More Blood Glucose News and Blood Glucose Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Clint Smith
The killing of George Floyd by a police officer has sparked massive protests nationwide. This hour, writer and scholar Clint Smith reflects on this moment, through conversation, letters, and poetry.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Graham
If former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin's case for the death of George Floyd goes to trial, there will be this one, controversial legal principle looming over the proceedings: The reasonable officer. In this episode, we explore the origin of the reasonable officer standard, with the case that sent two Charlotte lawyers on a quest for true objectivity, and changed the face of policing in the US. This episode was produced by Matt Kielty with help from Kelly Prime and Annie McEwen. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.