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GW researchers receive $1.6 million to improve cardiac function during heart failure

June 22, 2016

WASHINGTON (June 22, 2016) - Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) received $1.6 million from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to study a heart-brain connection that could help the nearly 23 million people suffering from heart failure worldwide. The four-year project will study ways to restore parasympathetic activity to the heart through oxytocin neuron activation, which could improve cardiac function during heart failure.

A distinctive hallmark of heart failure is autonomic imbalance, consisting of increased sympathetic activity and decreased parasympathetic activity. Parasympathetic activity is cardiac protective.

"Parasympathetic activity is what you have when you're reading a book, or relaxing, and counteracts the sympathetic activity you have when you're stuck on the metro or have an exam tomorrow," said David Mendelowitz, Ph.D., vice chair and professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences. "Heart failure is a disease that effects both neuro and cardiac function."

Unfortunately, few effective treatments exist to increase parasympathetic activity to the heart. Based upon exciting preliminary results, this study will examine the activation of neurons in the hypothalamus that release oxytocin, which has shown to increase parasympathetic activity in the heart. While oxytocin is often used to start or increase speed of labor, recent research has uncovered its role in feelings of generosity and bonding. It may also have beneficial effects on the heart.

The project is a collaboration between the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences and the GW School of Engineering and Applied Science.

"While Dr. Mendelowitz's research is focused on neuroscience and how the brain works, my work is focused on cardiac function. Heart failure is a disease that affects both, which is why it is imperative for Dr. Mendelowitz and I to use our complimentary expertise to solve this problem," said Matthew Kay, PE, DSc, associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the GW School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Kay and his research team will use high-speed optical assessments of heart function to identify heart-specific benefits of oxytocin nerve activation. Working together, Mendelowitz and Kay have the potential to unravel the complex interaction between the brain and the heart during heart failure.
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Media: To interview Dr. Mendelowitz, please contact Lisa Anderson at lisama2@gwu.edu or 202-994-3121; To interview Dr. Kay, please contact GW Media Relations at gwmedia@gwu.edu or 202-994-6460.

About the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences:

Founded in 1824, the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) was the first medical school in the nation's capital and is the 11th oldest in the country. Working together in our nation's capital, with integrity and resolve, the GW SMHS is committed to improving the health and well-being of our local, national and global communities. smhs.gwu.edu

About the GW School of Engineering and Applied Science:

GW's School of Engineering and Applied Science prepares engineers and computer scientists to address society's technological challenges by offering outstanding undergraduate, graduate and professional educational programs, and by providing innovative, fundamental and applied research activities. The school has 6 academic departments, 11 research centers, 90 faculty and more than 2,500 undergraduate and graduate students. Core areas of excellence include biomedical engineering, cybersecurity, high performance computing and simulation of engineering systems, nanotechnologies, robotics and systems engineering. seas.gwu.edu

George Washington University

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