Nav: Home

Human genes for coronary artery disease make them more prolific parents

June 22, 2017

Coronary artery disease may have persisted in human populations because the genes that cause this late-striking disease also contribute to greater numbers of children, reports Dr Sean Byars of The University of Melbourne and Associate Professor Michael Inouye of the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Australia, in a study published June 22, 2017 in PLOS Genetics.

Coronary artery disease, a condition where plaque builds up gradually in the arteries that feed the heart, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and may have plagued humans for thousands of years. One of the big questions surrounding the disease is why natural selection has not removed genes for this common and costly disease. In a new study, researchers used genetic information from the 1000 Genomes database and the International HapMap3 project, along with lifetime reproductive data from the Framingham Heart Study, to identify genetic variation linked to the disease that natural selection had also modified recently.

They showed that these same genetic variations also contribute in multiple ways to greater male and female reproductive success, which appears to represent an evolutionary trade-off between early-life reproductive benefits that compensate for later-life disease costs.

The findings offer an answer to the question of why natural selection cannot weed out genes associated with coronary artery disease - parents pass them on to their offspring before experiencing advanced symptoms and death. The study also provides a novel approach for detecting the influence of natural selection on traits caused by the cumulative effects of multiple genes, which in the past, has been far more difficult to uncover than for disorders linked to a single gene.
-end-
In your coverage please use this URL to provide access to the freely available article in PLOS Genetics: http://journals.plos.org/plosgenetics/article?id=10.1371/journal.pgen.1006328

Citation: Byars SG, Huang QQ, Gray L-A, Bakshi A, Ripatti S, Abraham G, et al. (2017) Genetic loci associated with coronary artery disease harbor evidence of selection and antagonistic pleiotropy. PLoS Genet 13(6): e1006328. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1006328

Funding: This study was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (grant no. 1062227) and the National Heart Foundation of Australia. MI was supported by a Career Development Fellowship co-funded by the NHMRC and the National Heart Foundation of Australia (no. 1061435). GA was supported by an NHMRC Peter Doherty Early Career Fellowship (no.1090462). SR was supported by the Academy of Finland Center of Excellence in Complex Disease Genetics (Grant No 213506 and 129680), Academy of Finland (Grant No 251217 and 285380), the Finnish Foundation for Cardiovascular Research, the Sigrid Juselius Foundation, Biocentrum Helsinki and the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement No 201413 (ENGAGE) and 261433 (BioSHaRE-EU), and Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme under grant agreement No 692145 (ePerMed). The Framingham Heart Study is conducted and supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) in collaboration with Boston University (Contract No. N01-HC-25195 and HHSN268201500001I). This manuscript was not prepared in collaboration with investigators of the Framingham Heart Study and does not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of the Framingham Heart Study, Boston University, or NHLBI. Funding for SHARe Affymetrix genotyping was provided by NHLBI Contract N02-HL-64278. SHARe Illumina genotyping was provided under an agreement between Illumina and Boston University. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

PLOS

Related Coronary Artery Disease Articles:

Human genes for coronary artery disease make them more prolific parents
Coronary artery disease may have persisted in human populations because the genes that cause this late-striking disease also contribute to greater numbers of children, reports Dr Sean Byars of The University of Melbourne and Associate Professor Michael Inouye of the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Australia, in a study published June 22, 2017 in PLOS Genetics.
Ancient Egyptians to modern humans: Coronary artery disease genes benefit reproduction
Researchers have found that genes for coronary heart disease (CAD) also influence reproduction, so in order to reproduce successfully, the genes for heart disease will also be inherited.
Decreasing cocaine use leads to regression of coronary artery disease
People who use cocaine regularly are at high risk of coronary artery disease.
Association between sugary diet and coronary artery disease
What connection is there between food and drink with added sugar and coronary artery disease?
Coronary artery disease tests prompt patients toward healthier habits
Undergoing a computer tomographic angiography was a better motivator to get people with suspected coronary artery disease to adopt healthier lifestyle practices than an exercise electrocardiography and stress test.
Depressed patients have more frequent chest pain even in the absence of coronary artery disease
Depressed patients have more frequent chest pain even in the absence of coronary artery disease, according to results from the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Salim Hayek, a cardiologist at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, US.1 The findings suggest that pain and depression may share a common neurochemical pathway.
Heart attack patients without obstructive coronary artery disease at high risk of residual angina
Patients without obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) are just as at risk of angina as those with obstructive CAD, according to new research published today in the European Heart Journal-Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes.
Diagnostic imaging can rule out coronary artery disease in patients with atypical chest pain
Non-invasive diagnostic imaging can rule out coronary artery disease (CAD) in about 50 percent of women with atypical chest pain who are at relatively low risk for CAD, while exposing them to only a modest dose of radiation.
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease shown to affect the development of coronary artery calcification
Data revealed today at The International Liver CongressTM 2015 show that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease plays a role in the early stages of coronary atherosclerosis and in its more severe form it can also promote the development of coronary artery calcification.
Computational fluid dynamics in coronary plaques predict coronary artery disease
A computational fluid dynamics simulation based on 3-D luminal reconstructions of the coronary artery tree can be used to analyze local flow fields and flow profiling resulting from changes in coronary artery geometry.

Related Coronary Artery Disease Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Changing The World
What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, "craftivist" Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#521 The Curious Life of Krill
Krill may be one of the most abundant forms of life on our planet... but it turns out we don't know that much about them. For a create that underpins a massive ocean ecosystem and lives in our oceans in massive numbers, they're surprisingly difficult to study. We sit down and shine some light on these underappreciated crustaceans with Stephen Nicol, Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania, Scientific Advisor to the Association of Responsible Krill Harvesting Companies, and author of the book "The Curious Life of Krill: A Conservation Story from the Bottom of the World".