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AGA and Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc. announce new grants for IBD researchers

June 23, 2016

Bethesda, MD (June 23, 2016) -- Thanks to a generous grant from Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A. Inc., the AGA Research Foundation is thrilled to announce three new research grants to fund young investigators working on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) projects. This funding will provide qualified scientists with the opportunity to make discoveries that will lead to improvements in patient care.

The AGA-Takeda Pharmaceuticals Research Scholar Awards in Inflammatory Bowel Disease will provide $90,000 per year for three years (total $270,000) to three young investigators working toward independent research careers with a focus on IBD. Interested researchers should apply to the AGA by Aug. 26.

"The AGA Research Foundation is very grateful to have Takeda's support for promising young researchers at a very vulnerable stage in their careers," said Robert S. Sandler, MD, MPH, AGAF, chair of the AGA Research Foundation. "Inflammatory bowel disease offers exciting opportunities for research, and we look forward to seeing how these three award recipients will advance our understanding of this serious digestive disease."

IBD, which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, impacts more than 5 million people worldwide. Often diagnosed in adolescent years, IBD can have a profound impact both physically and psychologically. Research to improve speed of diagnosis, expand treatment options and find evidence-based tools to help support patients can help ease the burden and advance the future of IBD care.

"Takeda is proud to partner with the AGA Research Foundation to present three research scholar awards in IBD," said Karen Lasch, MD, executive medical director, gastroenterology, Takeda. "As we look to the future, there is great promise with significant IBD research underway, but a strong need still exists for further scientific and clinical understanding. Providing young research investigators with the support they need to drive innovation and discovery is critical."

Interested researchers can learn more by visiting the AGA website. The deadline for applications is Aug. 26, 2016, for funding beginning July 1, 2017. The AGA Research Awards Panel is looking for individuals in the beginning years of their careers who have demonstrated exceptional promise and have some record of accomplishment in research.

The overall objective of the AGA Research Scholar Award (RSA) is to enable young investigators, instructors, research associates or equivalents to develop independent and productive research careers in digestive diseases by ensuring that a major proportion of their time is protected for research.
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About the American Gastroenterological Association

The American Gastroenterological Association is the trusted voice of the GI community. Founded in 1897, the AGA has grown to more than 16,000 members from around the globe who are involved in all aspects of the science, practice and advancement of gastroenterology. The AGA Institute administers the practice, research and educational programs of the organization. http://www.gastro.org.

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About the AGA Research Foundation

The AGA Research Foundation, formerly known as the Foundation for Digestive Health and Nutrition, is the cornerstone of AGA's effort to expand digestive disease research funding. Since 1984, the AGA, through its foundations, has provided more than $47 million in research grants to more than 870 scientists. The AGA Research Foundation serves as a bridge to the future of research in gastroenterology and hepatology by providing critical funding to advance the careers of young researchers between the end of training and the establishment of credentials that earn National Institutes of Health grants. Learn more about the AGA Research Foundation or make a contribution at http://www.gastro.org/foundation.

About Takeda

Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited (TSE: 4502) is a global, R&D-driven pharmaceutical company committed to bringing better health and a brighter future to patients by translating science into life-changing medicines. Takeda focuses its research efforts on oncology, gastroenterology and central nervous system therapeutic areas. It also has specific development programs in specialty cardiovascular diseases as well as late-stage candidates for vaccines. Takeda conducts R&D both internally and with partners to stay at the leading edge of innovation. New innovative products, especially in oncology, central nervous system and gastroenterology, as well as its presence in emerging markets, fuel the growth of Takeda. More than 30,000 Takeda employees are committed to improving quality of life for patients, working with our partners in health care in more than 70 countries. For more information, visit http://www.takeda.com/news.

American Gastroenterological Association

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