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Researchers investigate prevalence of gingivitis during 1st/2nd trimesters of pregnancy

June 23, 2016

Seoul, Republic of Korea - Today at the 94th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research, researcher Michael Reddy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA, will present a study titled "Gingivitis During the First/Second Trimesters of Pregnancy." The IADR General Session is being held in conjunction with the 3rd Meeting of the IADR Asia Pacific Region and the 35th Annual Meeting of the IADR Korean Division.

This investigation evaluated the effects of gestational age, study site, and demographic factors on first and second trimester pregnancy gingivitis using baseline data from a large multicenter study. Screening was conducted to identify pregnant women between 8-24 weeks of gestational age with at least 30 gingivitis bleeding sites. Trained examiners measured whole mouth gingivitis scores at up to 168 sites using a standard 4-point clinical index (Loe-Silness GI), and bleeding site counts were determined by subject. Using baseline values, regression analysis was used to analyze the natural history of gingival inflammation during the late first trimester through the second trimester of pregnancy.

For this study, 817 women were screened. Baseline gingivitis measures were collected on 746 women, and 666 evaluable women with 30+ bleeding sites were included in this baseline analysis. Mean gestational age at gingivitis examination was 17.1 weeks, while maternal age averaged 27.8 years, ranging from 18-46. The gingival inflammation mean was 51.2 sites, ranging from 30-144. From the regression analysis, study site and maternal age were significant factors in gingival bleeding. Centers differed by 4.0 gingival inflammation and younger women presented with higher measured gingival inflammation. Gestational age and ethnicity were not significant factors in gingival bleeding during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy.

Clinical examination of 600+ pregnant women showed moderate-to-severe gingivitis to be common, well-established and relatively stable in the late first and second trimester, and regular dental care prior to and during pregnancy may be critical to maintaining oral health.

This study was funded by a grant from the Procter and Gamble Company (#2011001).

This is a summary of oral session #0213 titled "Gingivitis During the First/Second Trimesters of Pregnancy," to be presented by Michael Reddy on Thursday, June 23, 2016, 9:15 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. at the COEX Convention and Exhibition Center, room 308A, as part of the session titled "Systemic Conditions & Periodontal Disease Epidemiology I."
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About the International Association for Dental Research

The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) is a nonprofit organization with nearly 10,500 individual members worldwide, dedicated to: (1) advancing research and increasing knowledge for the improvement of oral health worldwide, (2) supporting and representing the oral health research community, and (3) facilitating the communication and application of research findings. To learn more, visit http://www.iadr.org.

International & American Associations for Dental Research

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