Nav: Home

Mycobacterium in olive oil for cancer treatment

June 23, 2016

Researchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) with the collaboration of the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), led by the professor of the UAB Department of Genetics and Microbiology Esther Julián, announced one year ago that the cells of the Mycobacterium brumae offer an improved alternative to current bladder cancer treatments such as BCG (an immunotherapy based on the Mycobacterium bovis), which can cause infections.

Since then, they have been looking for ways to improve the immunotherapeutic activity of M. brumae through the design of different emulsions which can increase the homogeneity and stability, and therefore the efficacy, of the mycobacteria solutions when introduced into the body.

Researchers found a way to reduce the clumps produced naturally when mycobacteria cells, which possess a high content of lipids in their walls, are introduced into the usual aqueous solutions used for intravesical instillation in bladder cancer patients. This clumping may interfere with the interaction of the mycobacteria-host cells and negatively influence their antitumor effects.

Of the emulsions tested, the one based on olive oil induce a prominent immune response in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Olive oil preserves the viability of the mycobacteria and provided higher anti-clumping rates, and this indicates favourable conditions for reaching the bladder.

According to Esther Julián, "these results highlight the potential of the olive oil-based emulsion as a promising delivery vehicle for the mycobacterial treatment of bladder cancer".
-end-
The work, recently published in the journal Scientific Reports, from the publishers of Nature, was conducted by scientists from the Department of Genetics and Microbiology of the Faculty of Biosciences, the Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, and the Microbiology Service of the UAB, together with the Bacterial Infections and Antimicrobian Therapies group at the IBEC, Barcelona.

Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Related Bladder Cancer Articles:

Effectiveness of a new bladder cancer treatment demonstrated
Demonstrated the effectiveness of a drug for treating metastatic bladder cancer in patients who did not respond to the usual treatment.
Lifting the lid on bladder cancer support
Bladder cancer is a painful and sometimes life-threatening condition that patients can find difficult to talk about, with many becoming homebound as they cope with debilitating side effects such as incontinence.
How genomics profiling can help identify the best treatment for bladder cancer
A new computational tool -- a single-patient classifier -- effectively enables physicians to assign a bladder cancer subtype to an individual patient's cancer using that patient's genomic data.
Early menopause in smokers linked to bladder cancer
Research shows that experiencing menopause before the age of 45 is associated with a higher risk of bladder cancer.
Olfactory receptor as therapeutic target in bladder cancer
Researchers from Bochum have detected an olfactory receptor in the human bladder that might prove useful for bladder cancer therapy and diagnosis.
More Bladder Cancer News and Bladder Cancer Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...