Nav: Home

The 12th International Behavioral Ecology Congress held at Cornell University, Aug. 10-14

June 24, 2008

WHAT: 12th International Behavioral Ecology Congress

WHEN: August 10-14, 2008

WHERE: Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.

WHO: Hosted by the International Society for Behavioral Ecology

ITHACA, N.Y. - Journalists are welcome to attend the 12th International Behavioral Ecology Congress, hosted by the International Society for Behavioral Ecology, Aug. 10 -14, 2008, at Cornell University in Ithaca.

The congress features a wide variety of human and animal behavior talks and poster sessions, including plenary sessions on sexual selection and mating systems; the behavioral ecology of fertility decline in humans; kinship, cooperation and population structure in social birds; spider sociality; and the amazing sensory ecology of moles and shrews.
-end-
The program Web site: http://www.isbe2008cornell.org/program_talk.php

Conference registration fees for journalists will be waived, but journalists are responsible for their own hotel accommodations and meals. Journalists, if they wish, may participate in a conference meal plan. For details and media registration, please contact Blaine Friedlander, Cornell Press Relations Office at (607) 254-8093.

Cornell University

Related Cooperation Articles:

Maternal and paternal cooperation
Researchers disprove the assumption that parents conflict with one another during a plant's embryonic development.
Evolution of cooperation through longer memory
When we make a decision about whether or not to cooperate with someone, we usually base our decision on past experiences.
Wise deliberation sustains cooperation
Giving people time to think about cooperating on a task can have a positive effect if they are big-picture thinkers, but if they tend to focus on their own, immediate experience, the time to think may make them less cooperative, University of Waterloo research has found.
Multilab replication project examines cooperation under time pressure
In 2012, a trio of psychological scientists reported research showing that people who made quick decisions under time pressure were more likely to cooperate than were people who were required to take longer in their deliberations.
Blood ties fuel cooperation among species, not survival instinct
A new Oxford University study has found that survival instinct does not influence species cooperative breeding decisions.
More order with less judgment: An optimal theory of the evolution of cooperation
A research team led by mathematician Tatsuya Sasaki from the University of Vienna presents a new optimal theory of the evolution of reputation-based cooperation.
Cooperation helps mammals survive in tough environments
New research suggests that cooperative breeding makes mammal species such as meerkats better suited to dry, harsh climates.
Music at work increases cooperation, teamwork
Cornell University researchers found that music can have important effects on the cooperative spirits of those exposed to music.
Chimpanzees choose cooperation over competition
Tasks that require chimpanzees to work together preferred five-fold, despite opportunities for competition, aggression and freeloading.
New insights into the evolution of cooperation in spatially structured populations
Researchers have analyzed a new mathematical model to investigate how a population's spatial structure affects the evolution of cooperation.

Related Cooperation Reading:

The Evolution of Cooperation: Revised Edition
by Robert Axelrod (Author), Richard Dawkins (Foreword)

The Evolution of Cooperation provides valuable insights into the age-old question of whether unforced cooperation is ever possible. Widely praised and much-discussed, this classic book explores how cooperation can emerge in a world of self-seeking egoists-whether superpowers, businesses, or individuals-when there is no central authority to police their actions. The problem of cooperation is central to many different fields. Robert Axelrod recounts the famous computer tournaments in which the “cooperative” program Tit for Tat recorded its stunning victories, explains its application... View Details


An Operation of Cooperation (A Sami and Thomas Adventure)
by James McDonald (Author), James McDonald (Illustrator)

"Cooperation is said to be the most important word in the English language."
                                  -Napoleon Hill


On a sunny day
With two kids at play,
A problem comes about.

But rather than fight
And use their might,
They decide to figure it out.

Come along with Sami and Thomas on their adventure of cooperation, where a brother and a sister learn that working together makes for a much brighter day.

An Operation of Cooperation is an excellent classroom resource that shows the... View Details


Understanding Global Conflict and Cooperation: An Introduction to Theory and History (9th Edition)
by Joseph S. Nye Jr. (Author), David A. Welch (Author)

Updated in its 9th edition, Understanding Global Conflict and Cooperation is a concise and penetrating introduction to world politics in an era of complex interdependence. This text employs lessons from theory and history to examine conflict and cooperating among global actors and thus to provide readers with a durable analytical framework. From twentieth and twenty-first century wars to global finance and global governance, Understanding Global Conflict and Cooperation, expands substantially on a classic work and continues to deliver a... View Details


Stick and Stone
by Beth Ferry (Author), Tom Lichtenheld (Illustrator)

When Stick rescues Stone from a prickly situation with a Pinecone, the pair becomes fast friends. But when Stick gets stuck, can Stone return the favor?
Author Beth Ferry makes a memorable debut with a warm, rhyming text that includes a subtle anti-bullying message even the youngest reader will understand. New York Times bestselling illustrator Tom Lichtenheld imbues Stick and Stone with energy, emotion, and personality to spare.
        In this funny story about kindness and friendship, Stick and Stone join George and Martha, Frog and Toad, and Elephant and Piggie, as... View Details


Team Challenges: 170+ Group Activities to Build Cooperation, Communication, and Creativity
by Kris Bordessa (Author)

Team Challenges 170+ Group Activities to Build Cooperation, Communication, and Creativity by Bordessa, Kris. Published by Chicago Review Press,2005, Binding: Paperback View Details


Understanding Global Conflict and Cooperation: An Introduction to Theory and History (10th Edition)
by Joseph S. Nye Jr. (Author), David A. Welch (Author)

For courses in Introduction to International Relations

An overview of international relations that highlights conflict and cooperation among and within states
Understanding Global Conflict and Cooperation: An Introduction to Theory and History provides a concise, insightful introduction to world politics in an era of complex interdependence. Authors Joseph Nye and David Welch examine conflict and cooperation among global actors via lessons from theory and history, providing readers with a durable framework with which to analyze the current state of... View Details


Kid Cooperation: How to Stop Yelling, Nagging, and Pleading and Get Kids to Cooperate
by Elizabeth Pantley (Author)

Would you like to know how to get your children to willingly cooperate? Would you like to eliminate many of your daily battles and end the yelling, nagging, and pleading? Would you like to handle discipline issues with knowledge and authority? During this process, would you like to learn how to boost your children’s self-esteem, feel better about yourself as a person, and even improve your marriage?

This book is filled with real ideas for real families—practical, purposeful things you can do to improve family life. With the tools and skills presented in Kid Cooperation you... View Details


What We Made: Conversations on Art and Social Cooperation
by Tom Finkelpearl (Author)

In What We Made, Tom Finkelpearl examines the activist, participatory, coauthored aesthetic experiences being created in contemporary art. He suggests social cooperation as a meaningful way to think about this work and provides a framework for understanding its emergence and acceptance. In a series of fifteen conversations, artists comment on their experiences working cooperatively, joined at times by colleagues from related fields, including social policy, architecture, art history, urban planning, and new media. Issues discussed include the experiences of working in public and of... View Details


Understanding Global Conflict and Cooperation: An Introduction to Theory and History, Books a la Carte Edition (10th Edition)
by Joseph S. Nye Jr. (Author), David A. Welch (Author)

View Details


After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy (Princeton Classic Editions)
by Robert O. Keohane (Author)

This book is a comprehensive study of cooperation among the advanced capitalist countries. Can cooperation persist without the dominance of a single power, such as the United States after World War II? To answer this pressing question, Robert Keohane analyzes the institutions, or "international regimes," through which cooperation has taken place in the world political economy and describes the evolution of these regimes as American hegemony has eroded. Refuting the idea that the decline of hegemony makes cooperation impossible, he views international regimes not as weak substitutes for... View Details

Best Science Podcasts 2017

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2017. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Manipulation
We think we're the ones who control what we see, read, think and remember. But is that true? Who decides? And who should decide? This hour, TED speakers reveal just how easily we can be manipulated. Guests include design ethicist Tristan Harris, MSNBC host Ali Velshi, psychologist Elizabeth Loftus, and neuroscientist Steve Ramirez.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#443 Batteries
This week on Science for the People we take a deep dive into modern batteries: how they work now and how they might work in the future. We speak with Gerbrand Ceder from UC Berkeley, about the most commonly used batteries today, how they work, and how they could work better. And we talk with Kathryn Toghill, electrochemist from Lancaster University, about redox flow batteries and how they could help make our power grids more sustainable.