American Chemical Society selects 10 semifinalists for Chemistry Champions contest

June 24, 2014

WASHINGTON, June 24, 2014 -- The American Chemical Society (ACS) today named 10 semifinalists in its Chemistry Champions contest. The contest aims to find and train promising science communicators -- perhaps even find the Carl Sagan of chemistry. Undergraduate, graduate, and early career chemists and chemical engineers entered the contest by submitting 2-3 minute videos describing their work and why they wanted to be the Chemistry Champion. The semifinalists were selected by a panel of 11 judges from 27 video applicants.

The 10 semifinalists and their video titles are:

Jennifer Apell, graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, "An Environmental Benefit of Plastic"

Geoff Dubrow, graduate student at the University of Minnesota, "Understanding Whisky Chemistry"

Tien Nguyen, Ph.D., recent graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, "Finding Better Ways to Build Chemical Bonds"

Jennifer Novotney, graduate student at Cornell University, "Frameworks for the Future"

Tierra Range, undergraduate student at Centenary College of Louisiana, "Solar Cell Research"

Ashlee Robison, undergraduate student at Fort Lewis College, "Preventing Honeybee Decline"

Alexis Shusterman, graduate student at the University of California at Berkeley, "CO2 Monitoring in HD"

Shane Stone, undergraduate student at Syracuse University, "Biofuel Catalyst Research"

Krista Wilson, Ph.D., assistant professor at Wingate University, "Chemistry of Frogs to Develop New Methods of Pain Relief"

Shannon Woodruff, graduate student at Southern Methodist University, "Chemistry to Better Deliver Medicine Inside Cells"

The semifinalists will be flown to the ACS National Meeting in San Francisco for closed-door competition on August 9. Five finalists will then be selected to present their research to a live public audience in San Francisco on Sunday, August 10. For more details about the contest, visit http://www.acs.org/chemchamps. All eligible videos entered in the Chemistry Champions contest are available via the YouTube playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLLG7h7fPoH8LQwsyZL_2gPR4pqP5zLKkX.
-end-
The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 161,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org">newsroom@acs.org.

Follow us: Twitter | Facebook

American Chemical Society

Related Chemistry Articles from Brightsurf:

Searching for the chemistry of life
In the search for the chemical origins of life, researchers have found a possible alternative path for the emergence of the characteristic DNA pattern: According to the experiments, the characteristic DNA base pairs can form by dry heating, without water or other solvents.

Sustainable chemistry at the quantum level
University of Pittsburgh Associate Professor John A. Keith is using new quantum chemistry computing procedures to categorize hypothetical electrocatalysts that are ''too slow'' or ''too expensive'', far more thoroughly and quickly than was considered possible a few years ago.

Can ionic liquids transform chemistry?
Table salt is a commonplace ingredient in the kitchen, but a different kind of salt is at the forefront of chemistry innovation.

Principles for a green chemistry future
A team led by researchers from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies recently authored a paper featured in Science that outlines how green chemistry is essential for a sustainable future.

Sugar changes the chemistry of your brain
The idea of food addiction is a very controversial topic among scientists.

Reflecting on the year in chemistry
A lot can happen in a year, especially when it comes to science.

Better chemistry through tiny antennae
A research team at The University of Tokyo has developed a new method for actively controlling the breaking of chemical bonds by shining infrared lasers on tiny antennae.

Chemistry in motion
For the first time, researchers have managed to view previously inaccessible details of certain chemical processes.

Researchers enrich silver chemistry
Researchers from Russia and Saudi Arabia have proposed an efficient method for obtaining fundamental data necessary for understanding chemical and physical processes involving substances in the gaseous state.

The chemistry behind kibble (video)
Have you ever thought about how strange it is that dogs eat these dry, weird-smelling bits of food for their entire lives and never get sick of them?

Read More: Chemistry News and Chemistry Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.