More magazine freelance writer receives Endocrine Society journalism award

June 24, 2014

Chicago, IL--Freelance journalist Cathryn Jakobson Ramin received the Endocrine Society's annual Award for Excellence in Science and Medical Journalism, the Society announced today.

Ramin, of Mill Valley, CA, was honored at the Society's 96th Annual Meeting & Expo in Chicago, IL, for her winning article, "The Hormone Hoax Thousands Fall For". The article was published in the October 2013 issue of More magazine.

Established in 2008, the award was created to recognize outstanding reporting that enhances the public understanding of health issues pertaining to the field of endocrinology.

In her investigative article, Ramin examined the process of compounding medications and the health risks this can pose to women who are prescribed hormone therapy for hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms. Her coverage found inconsistencies in the level of hormones when identical prescriptions were filled by 12 different compounding pharmacies. She was recognized for her in-depth research and ability to clearly explain how hormones function in terms easily understood by the average reader.

The Award for Excellence in Science and Medical Journalism consists of a presentation at the Society's awards banquet, as well as travel and accommodations to attend the Society's Annual Meeting. The meeting is currently being held jointly with the International Congress of Endocrinology in Chicago, IL, from June 21-24.
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More information on the Endocrine Society Award for Excellence in Science and Medical Journalism is available at: https://www.endocrine.org/news-room/journalism-award.

Founded in 1916, the Endocrine Society is the world's oldest, largest and most active organization devoted to research on hormones and the clinical practice of endocrinology. Today, the Endocrine Society's membership consists of over 17,000 scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in more than 100 countries. Society members represent all basic, applied and clinical interests in endocrinology. The Endocrine Society is based in Washington, DC. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site at http://www.endocrine.org. Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/#!/EndoMedia.

The Endocrine Society

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