OpenAnesthesia® announces Android and iOS versions of self-study app

June 24, 2014

June 24, 2014 - OpenAnesthesia (OA), one of the most popular websites for education in anesthesia, announces the release of V 3.0 of the hugely popular self-study app for anesthesiology residents, CRNAs, SRNAs, and physicians. The app, specifically designed to improve knowledge within the field of anesthesiology, is free to download on iTunes and the Google Store.

The OA Self-Study App for iOS and Android devices is designed to help resident anesthesiologists, physicians, and those in the related health professions to improve their knowledge of basic and advanced concepts of the field. The OA app contains all ABA keywords from the 2008-2014 in-training examinations, provides 50 free questions for all users, and offers an additional 450 questions for in-app purchase. All the questions review essential core concepts. Each question has been written by a physician editor and contains a full explanation of the answer, along with links to related keywords and articles in OpenAnesthesia, Anesthesia & Analgesia, A&A Case Reports, and PubMed.

Edward C. Nemergut, MD, founder of OpenAnesthesia, says: "Many of our users have asked for additional study questions, as well as an Android version, and I'm delighted that we can finally offer both with Release 3.0." Adds Dr. Nemergut, "The overwhelming worldwide response we've had to this app tells us that the need for solid online tools - such as our OA app - is essential for the new generation of residents and physicians."
-end-
About OpenAnesthesia

OpenAnesthesia, sponsored by the IARS, was founded in 2009 and has quickly become a leading reference source for anesthesiology residents, physicians, CRNAs and other medical professionals. OpenAnesthesia.org website is one of the most widely-used references for resident anesthesiologists and physicians. The site's popular "Questions of the Day" feature is visited by thousands of users daily. Additional features include a rich multimedia library with podcasts and instructional videos, the TEE of the Month, the Article of the Month, video summaries of each monthly issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, and Virtual Grand Rounds in Obstetric Anesthesia.

About the IARS

The http://www.iars.org/International Anesthesia Research Society is a nonpolitical, not-for-profit medical society founded in 1922 to advance and support scientific research and education related to anesthesia, and to improve patient care through basic research. The IARS contributes nearly $1 million annually to fund anesthesia research; provides a forum for anesthesiology leaders to share information and ideas; maintains a worldwide membership of more than 15,000 physicians, physician residents, and others with doctoral degrees, as well as health professionals in anesthesia-related practice; sponsors the SmartTots initiative in partnership with the FDA; and publishes the monthly Anesthesia & Analgesia journal in print and online as well as the clinical companion journal A&A Case Reports, published semi-monthly.

About Amphetamobile

Amphetamobile, LLC (AMMO), is a Philadelphia-area development company specializing in the delivery of mobile content and education. AMMO has expertise in strategic development, a deep understanding of scholars and clinicians and their unique needs and workflows, and the resources and technology to ensure successful implementation. The company provides web, mobile web, and native (iOS and Android) mobile application development, design, and consulting. AMMO apps have received critical acclaim, mobile awards and the delight of end users.

Wolters Kluwer Health

Related Anesthesia Articles from Brightsurf:

Does general anesthesia increase dementia risk?
There are concerns that exposure to general anesthesia during surgery may contribute to an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease.

Cannabis use prompts need for more anesthesia during surgery, increases pain
Not only might cannabis users require more anesthesia during surgery than non-users, they may have increased pain afterwards and use higher doses of opioids while in the hospital, suggests first-of-its kind research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting.

COVID-19 testing of children before anesthesia saves PPE
Universal COVID-19 testing of children who are having procedures requiring anesthesia promotes efficient use of personal protective equipment (PPE), according to research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting.

How do we disconnect from the environment during sleep and under anesthesia?
A series of new studies by researchers at Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience finds, among other important discoveries, that noradrenaline, a neurotransmitter secreted in response to stress, lies at the heart of our ability to ''shut off'' our sensory responses and sleep soundly.

Scientists unveil how general anesthesia works
The discovery of general anesthetics -- compounds which induce unconsciousness, prevent control of movement and block pain -- helped transform dangerous operations into safe surgery.

Surgery with anesthesia not linked to indicator of Alzheimer's, Mayo study finds
Older adults who have surgery with general anesthesia may experience a modest acceleration of cognitive decline, even years later.

Choice of anesthesia may affect breast cancer metastases
A new study led by Stony Brook University Cancer Center researchers to be published in Nature Communications suggests that the choice of anesthesia may change the metastatic process of breast cancer by affecting the cytokine and microenvironment.

Is headache from anesthesia after childbirth associated with risk of bleeding around brain?
This study examined whether postpartum women with headache from anesthesia after neuraxial anesthesia (such as epidural) during childbirth had increased risk of being diagnosed with bleeding around the brain (intracranial subdural hematoma).

Music can be a viable alternative to medications in reducing anxiety before anesthesia
Music is a viable alternative to sedative medications in reducing patient anxiety prior to a peripheral nerve block procedure, according to a new Penn Medicine study.

In cases when patients under anesthesia experience anaphylaxis, hyperactive immune...
A study of 86 patients reveals how drugs used for anesthesia can induce life-threatening anaphylaxis (a dangerous type of allergic reaction) through an alternative immune pathway.

Read More: Anesthesia News and Anesthesia Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.