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Fischman receives Pharmacology/Therapeutics/Toxicology Research Award

June 25, 2008

Alexandria, Va. - The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) has selected Dr. Stuart Fischman, Professor of Oral Diagnostic Sciences (Emeritus) at the School of Dental Medicine, at the State University of New York, Buffalo, as the 2008 recipient of the Pharmacology/Therapeutics/Toxicology Research Award. The award will be presented at the IADR 86th General Session & Exhibition in Toronto, ON, Canada on July 2, 2008.

Dr. Fischman has made significant contributions to the evaluation of drugs used to prevent and treat the two most common diseases seen in dental practice - dental caries and periodontal diseases. The design and analysis of clinical trials of agents designed to prevent dental caries, calculus formation, and gingivitis complemented his activities in oral pathology and oral medicine. He designed and managed the studies, but also published many guidelines to aid colleagues in conducting such studies. His research studies, numbering more than 100, have evaluated a number of chemical agents for their ability to prevent calculus formation, reduce plaque accumulation, and prevent or reduce gingivitis. Several publications and presentations reviewed the various methodologies and indices, to provide "benchmarks" for colleagues. These publications continue to be widely cited in reviews and clinical trials.

Dr. Fischman has served the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) as a member of the Ethics Committee. This committee has made several recommendations to ensure that clinical trials are conducted in a professionally responsible manner. Dr. Fischman was a "founding member" of the IADR Pharmacology/Therapeutics/Toxicology Scientific Group. He served the Group as officer, rising through the ranks from "Member at Large" in 1979 to President in 1991. Although officially "retiring" in 1997, he remains very active in dental professional activities.

Supported by Wyeth Consumer Healthcare, the Pharmacology/Therapeutics/Toxicology Research Award is one of the 16 IADR Distinguished Scientist Awards and is one of the highest honors bestowed by the IADR. The Award is made for outstanding and sustained peer-reviewed research that has contributed to our knowledge of the mechanisms, efficacy, or safety of drugs used in dentistry and consists of a cash prize and a plaque.
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About the International Association for Dental Research

The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) is a non-profit organization with more than 10,500 individual members worldwide, dedicated to: (1) advancing research and increasing knowledge to improve oral health, (2) supporting the oral health research community, and (3) facilitating the communication and application of research findings for the improvement of oral health worldwide.

To learn more about the IADR, visit www.iadr.org.

International & American Associations for Dental Research

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