Nav: Home

Gays and lesbians who feel supported are more certain about retirement prospects

June 26, 2017

Gay men and Lesbians who don't feel socially supported feel less secure about their retirement than heterosexual adults, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.

The study of working Canadians aged 45 to 70 found the majority of them believed that retirement by age 62 was achievable. While the number held true for gay men and lesbians who felt socially supported, it dropped by a year more for those that felt isolated or marginalized.

Certainty of retirement age and perceived adequacy of retirement finances were also less secure the less supported gay men and lesbians felt.

"Psychological research shows that the more people feel supported, the more future oriented and planful they are," said Steven Mock, a professor of recreation and leisure studies at Waterloo and author of the study. "Research also tell us that those who may feel marginalized, such as members of the gay and lesbian communities, pay closer attention to social cues then the general population, which could heighten the impact of support perceptions on planning.

"Because perceptions of support appear to have an impact on expectations relating to retirement age and finances, inclusive language and clear support for gay and lesbian clients is something that businesses and financial institutions will need to be aware of when assisting with retirement planning."

As part of the study, the researchers drew on data from the General Social Survey conducted by Statistics Canada in 2007. Analyses included over 6,000 working Canadians aged 45 to 70. Support, in the study, was defined as having people in your life you could trust, rely on and feel close to.

This study, supported by the Royal Bank of Canada, was recently published in the Canadian Journal of Aging.
-end-


University of Waterloo

Related Aging Articles:

Brain development and aging
The brain is a complex organ -- a network of nerve cells, or neurons, producing thought, memory, action, and feeling.
Aging gracefully in the rainforest
In an article that appears in the current issue of Evolutionary Anthropology, researchers synthesize over 15 years of theoretical and empirical findings from long-term study of the Tsimane forager-farmers.
Reversing aging now possible!
DGIST's research team identified the mechanism of reversible recovery of aging cells by inducing lysosomal activation.
Brain-aging gene discovered
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have discovered a common genetic variant that greatly affects normal brain aging in older adults.
Aging can be good for you (if you're a yeast)
It's a cheering thought for anyone heading towards their golden years.
How eating less can slow the aging process
New research shows why calorie restriction made mice live longer and healthier lives.
Turning back the aging clock
By boosting genes that destroy defective mitochondrial DNA, researchers can slow down and potentially reverse an important part of the aging process.
Insilico Medicine launches a deep learned biomarker of aging, Aging.AI 2.0 for testing
Insilico Medicine, Inc., a company applying latest advances in deep learning to biomarker development, drug discovery and aging research, launched Aging.AI 2.0.
Substance with the potential to postpone aging
The coenzyme NAD+ plays a main role in aging processes.
What does a healthy aging cat look like?
Just as improved diet and medical care have resulted in increased life expectancy in humans, advances in nutrition and veterinary care have increased the life span of pet cats.

Related Aging Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...