Nav: Home

NASA catches a view of a fading Tropical Cyclone Daniel

June 26, 2018

Tropical Storm Daniel was weakening when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead on June 24 and by June 26 the storm degenerated into a remnant low pressure area.

On June 24, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Daniel at 2:30 p.m. EDT (1830 UTC), when it was off the west coast of Mexico. The image showed a small, concentrated area of strong storms around the center of circulation with bands of thunderstorms feeding into the center.

Two and a half hours later, the National Hurricane Center noted "Daniel continues to generate a curved band of convection near the center, although the cloud tops have warmed notably during the past several hours."

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on June 26, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) issued the final advisory on Daniel. At that time, the center of Post-Tropical Cyclone Daniel was located near latitude 20.0 degrees north and longitude 120.2 degrees west. That's about 690 miles (1,115 km) west-southwest

The post-tropical cyclone is moving toward the west-northwest near 9 mph (15 kph). NHC forecasters noted that a westward motion is expected to start later today. Maximum sustained winds are near 30 mph (45 kph) with higher gusts and is forecast to dissipate by Wednesday night, June 27.
-end-


NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Center Articles:

More Center News and Center Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Warped Reality
False information on the internet makes it harder and harder to know what's true, and the consequences have been devastating. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around technology and deception. Guests include law professor Danielle Citron, journalist Andrew Marantz, and computer scientist Joy Buolamwini.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

How to Win Friends and Influence Baboons
Baboon troops. We all know they're hierarchical. There's the big brutish alpha male who rules with a hairy iron fist, and then there's everybody else. Which is what Meg Crofoot thought too, before she used GPS collars to track the movements of a troop of baboons for a whole month. What she and her team learned from this data gave them a whole new understanding of baboon troop dynamics, and, moment to moment, who really has the power.  This episode was reported and produced by Annie McEwen. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.