Nav: Home

New female external catheter technology reduces CAUTI by 50%

June 26, 2019

Hospital-wide introduction of new female external catheter technology halved the number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

After identifying a slow climb in the number of CAUTIs from 2016 to the first quarter of 2018, infection preventionists (IPs) at NYC Health + Hospitals/Coney Island introduced the hospital's healthcare provers to new female external catheter technology - an alternative and non-invasive method of managing incontinent patients.

"The leading risk factor for CAUTI development is prolonged use of indwelling Foley catheters," said study author Briana Episcopia, BS, RN, CIC. "The female external catheter gave doctors and nurses an alternative that eliminated the need for an indwelling catheter, ultimately eliminating some patients' risk of developing this type of infection."

Utilizing data from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), researchers compared inpatient infections, Foley utilization, and the standardized infection ratio (SIR) pre- and post-implementation (October 2017 to September 2018). Highlights included:
  • A hospital-wide reduction of inpatient CAUTIs by 51.7 percent.
  • Reduction of the Foley utilization rate from 15.7 to 10.7, which resulted in a decline in the number of Foley days for the hospital.
"CAUTI reduction is a top priority for the overall reduction of healthcare-associated infections," said 2019 APIC President Karen Hoffmann, RN, MS, CIC, FSHEA, FAPIC. "The female external catheter may provide an important advancement as we strive to reduce the risk of infection."
-end-


Association for Professionals in Infection Control

Related Healthcare Articles:

LGBT+ women face barriers to healthcare
New study suggests diversity messaging is not filtering down to frontline staff.
US and China should collaborate, not compete, to bring AI to healthcare
In the wake of the US government ordering the Chinese artificial intelligence company, iCarbonX, to divest its majority ownership stake in the Cambridge, Mass.-based company PatientsLikeMe, Eric Topol, MD, of Scripps Research, has co-written a commentary arguing for more, not less, collaboration between China and the US on artificial intelligence (AI) development.
Study highlights need for integrated healthcare for the homeless
A University of Birmingham study has found alarming evidence of severe mental health problems, substance dependence and alcohol misuse amongst homeless population.
Understanding C. auris transmission with the healthcare environment
Researchers have now shown that patients who are heavily colonized with Candida auris on their skin can shed the fungus and contaminate their surroundings.
Three quarters of Americans concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals
Nearly three-quarters (74%) of Americans are concerned about burnout among healthcare professionals, according to new survey data released today by ASHP (American Society of Health-System Pharmacists).
Novel healthcare program for former prisoners reduces recidivism
A healthcare program tailored to the needs of recently released prisoners can significantly reduce recidivism, according to a new study led by a Yale researcher.
Are healthcare providers 'second victims' of medical errors?
Four women with family members who died as a result of preventable medical error penned an editorial for The BMJ urging abandonment of the term 'second victims' to describe healthcare providers who commit errors.
Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace
Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace, according to a professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Network driving emergency healthcare research
The Emergency Medicine Foundation -- Australia has successfully piloted a Research Support Network to foster research in more than 30 Queensland public hospital emergency departments.
Healthcare providers -- not hackers -- leak more of your data
New research from Michigan State University and Johns Hopkins University found that more than half of the recent personal health information, or PHI, data breaches were because of internal issues with medical providers -- not because of hackers or external parties.
More Healthcare News and Healthcare Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#540 Specialize? Or Generalize?
Ever been called a "jack of all trades, master of none"? The world loves to elevate specialists, people who drill deep into a single topic. Those people are great. But there's a place for generalists too, argues David Epstein. Jacks of all trades are often more successful than specialists. And he's got science to back it up. We talk with Epstein about his latest book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.