Nav: Home

The trouble with being a handsome bird

June 27, 2017

Male birds often use brightly coloured plumage to be attractive to females. However, such eye-catching trimmings may also attract unwanted attention from predators. Now, a new study led by Monash University has found that showy males indeed perceive themselves to be at a greater risk of predation.

The study's lead author, PhD student Alex McQueen, from the School of Biological Sciences, studied risk-taking behaviour in Australia's favourite bird, the superb fairy wren, also known as the blue wren. Every year, male wrens change their colour from dull brown to a stunning combination of brilliant azure blue, with contrasting dark-blue and black plumage.

This annual colour change makes them a useful study species for measuring the risk of being brightly coloured, as the behaviour of the same individual bird can be compared while he is in different colours.

As part of this study, published in the Royal Society Journal Proceedings B, researchers snuck up on unsuspecting fairy-wrens. They then broadcast fairy-wren alarm calls from portable speakers, and observed the behaviour of the birds.

"When birds hear such alarm calls, it tells them there might be a predator nearby," says Alex. "Whether they ignore the alarm or flee to cover, and the amount of time taken to re-appear from cover, tells us how high they perceive their predation risk to be.

"We found that fairy-wrens were more cautious while they were bright blue: they fled more often in response to alarm calls, and took longer to re-emerge from hiding. They also spent more time in cover, and more time scanning their surroundings."

Alex's supervisor, Associate Professor Anne Peters said an interesting observation was that brown fairy-wrens appeared to take advantage of the risks faced by blue males.

Fairy-wrens go about in social groups, often made up of individuals in different plumage colours.

"When a blue male was nearby, fairy-wrens spent less time hiding in cover after fleeing in response to alarm calls, and devoted less time to keeping a look-out," Associate Professor Peters said.

"This could be because the dull brown wrens view blue males as a colourful decoy that reduces their own risk, or because blue males are more vigilant, allowing the brown wrens to drop their guard."

The study, which was done in collaboration with Professor Rob Magrath from the Australian National University (ANU), shows that fairy-wrens perceive themselves to be at higher risk when they display their bright blue plumage, and adjust their behaviour accordingly.
-end-


Monash University

Related Birds Articles:

Some dinosaurs could fly before they were birds
New research using the most comprehensive study of feathered dinosaurs and early birds has revised the evolutionary relationships of dinosaurs at the origin of birds.
If it's big enough and leafy enough the birds will come
A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology highlights specific features of urban green spaces that support the greatest diversity of bird species.
How do birds understand 'foreign' calls?
New research from Kyoto University show that the coal tit (Periparus ater) can eavesdrop and react to the predatory warning calls of the Japanese tit (Parus minor) and evokes a visual image of the predator in their mind
How birds evolved big brains
An international team of evolutionary biologists and paleontologists have reconstructed the evolution of the avian brain using a massive dataset of brain volumes from dinosaurs, extinct birds like Archaeopteryx and the great auk, and modern birds.
Microelectronics for birds
Ornithologists and physicists from St Petersburg University have conducted an interdisciplinary study together with colleagues from Sechenov Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Biological Station Rybachy of the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences.
Birds of a feather better not together
A new study of North American birds from Washington University in St.
Not-so-dirty birds? Not enough evidence to link wild birds to food-borne illness
Despite the perception that wild birds in farm fields can cause food-borne illness, a WSU study has found little evidence linking birds to E. coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter outbreaks.
Birds are shrinking as the climate warms
After 40 years of collecting birds that ran into Chicago buildings, scientists have been able to show that the birds have been shrinking as the climate's warmed up.
Diving birds follow each other when fishing
Diving seabirds watch each other to work out when to dive, new research shows.
Why do birds migrate at night?
Researchers found migratory birds maximize how much light they get from their environment, so they can migrate even at night. 
More Birds News and Birds Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Warped Reality
False information on the internet makes it harder and harder to know what's true, and the consequences have been devastating. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around technology and deception. Guests include law professor Danielle Citron, journalist Andrew Marantz, and computer scientist Joy Buolamwini.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.