Nav: Home

Electrospun sodium titanate speeds up the purification of nuclear waste water

June 27, 2018

Electrospun sodium titanate speeds up the purification of water based on selective ion exchange - effectively extracts radio-active strontium

With the help of this new method, waste water can be treated faster than before, and the environmentally positive aspect is that the process leaves less solid radio-active waste.

The properties of electrospun sodium titanate are equal to those of commercially produced ion-exchange materials.

- The advantages of electrospun materials are due to the kinetics, i.e. reaction speed, of ion exchange, says Risto Koivula, a scientist in the research group Ion Exchange for Nuclear Waste Treatment and for Recycling at the Department of Chemistry at the University of Helsinki.

Synthetic sodium titanate is known as an effective remover of strontium, and granular sodium titanate is used in industrial quantities.

The purging method based on ion exchange was originally developed by Jukka Lehto and Risto Harjula from the University of Helsinki.

At present, granular sodium titanate is used to purify e.g. the waste water from the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

As it is run through an ion exchanger loaded into column, the radio-active strontium in the water is changed into sodium.

When the ion exchange capacity is filled, the filtering material has to be switched out. This leaves some solid radio-active waste.

- Since less electrospun material is needed from the start of the process, the radio-active waste requiring a permanent repository will also fit in a smaller space, says Koivula.

The electrospinning equpiment at the University of Helsinki was developed and built in the centre of excellence for atomic layer deposition, led by Mikko Ritala. The researchers successfully tried this quite simple method for working sodium titanate into fibre. Koivula's team studied the ion exchange features of fibre produced this way and found it worked like the commercially produced ones.
-end-
More details:

Researcher Risto Koivula, Ion exchange for nuclear waste treatment and for recycling research group, University of Helsinki, email: Risto.Koivula@helsinki.fi, Phone: + 358 50 4486640

University of Helsinki

Related Sodium Articles:

Did amount of sodium households acquire in packaged food, beverages decrease?
Excessive dietary sodium is a modifiable risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular disease, and the Institute of Medicine has said it is essential to reduce sodium in packaged foods.
Phosphorene-like SiS and SiSe: Promising anode materials for sodium-ion batteries
Seeking for appropriate anode materials is crucial for the development of sodium-ion batteries.
Super P carbon black for reversible lithium and sodium ion storage
Super P carbon black (SPCB) has been widely used as the conducting additive in lithium/sodium ion batteries.
Low-sodium diet might not lower blood pressure
A new study that followed more than 2,600 men and women for 16 years found that consuming less sodium wasn't associated with lower blood pressure.
Sodium citrate spray could temporarily restore sense of smell
A substance commonly used to treat bladder issues could temporarily treat people who have lost their sense of smell, according to research published in the journal Clinical Otolaryngology.
Imaging the inner workings of a sodium-metal sulfide battery for first time
Scientists discover that the iron sulfide battery material undergoes significant changes in its microstructure and chemical composition as sodium ions enter and leave the material during the first discharge/charge cycle, leading to an initial loss in battery capacity.
Making sodium-ion batteries that last
Lithium-ion batteries have become essential in everyday technology. But these power sources can explode under certain circumstances and are not ideal for grid-scale energy storage.
Skin sodium content linked to heart problems in patients with kidney disease
Elevated sodium content in the skin correlates closely with left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with chronic kidney disease.
Children's menus still laden with fat, sodium, and calories despite industry pledges
Despite a 2011 pledge among United States chain restaurants to improve the nutritional value of children's menu options, a new study finds no significant improvements have been made to cut calories, saturated fat, or sodium.
Most Americans consume too much sodium, not enough potassium
A majority of Americans consume too much sodium and not enough potassium, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.

Related Sodium Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Changing The World
What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, "craftivist" Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#521 The Curious Life of Krill
Krill may be one of the most abundant forms of life on our planet... but it turns out we don't know that much about them. For a create that underpins a massive ocean ecosystem and lives in our oceans in massive numbers, they're surprisingly difficult to study. We sit down and shine some light on these underappreciated crustaceans with Stephen Nicol, Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania, Scientific Advisor to the Association of Responsible Krill Harvesting Companies, and author of the book "The Curious Life of Krill: A Conservation Story from the Bottom of the World".