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Appealing finding suggests why refrigeration dampens banana aromas 

June 27, 2018

Bananas are one of the world's most popular fruits. But how they're stored prior to reaching grocery shelves can adversely affect their flavor and smell. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that cold temperatures suppress the activity of proteins that play a key role in the formation of the banana's distinct aromas. They say this discovery could lead to enhancements of the fruit's fragrance and flavor. 

Billions of bananas are devoured worldwide every year. A typical American eats about 11 pounds of this fruit annually, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Most bananas are grown overseas, which means to reach U.S. shores intact, they must be shipped in refrigerated containers. Although chilling delays ripening, it also can damage the fruit and subdue its aroma. Previously, researchers found that proteins called transcription factors (TFs), which help regulate the activity of certain genes, are involved in fruit ripening. Building on this work, Jian-fei Kuang and colleagues wanted to find out if a particular set of TFs play a role in the dampening of aromas in chilled or refrigerated bananas.

The scientists stored freshly harvested green bananas either in the cold or at room temperature. Once removed from storage, the chilled bananas ripened more slowly than those that had been stored at room temperature, and they had an off-flavor. In a series of experiments, the research team found that refrigeration decreased the activity of aroma-forming genes during ripening. Digging deeper, they detected a pair of TFs called MabZIP4 and MabZIP5 that appear to play an important role in activating these genes. The researchers conclude that a better understanding of this regulatory process could lead to strategies to make bananas smell even better. 
-end-
The authors acknowledge funding from the National Key Research and Development Program of China, Zhujiang New Star of Science and Technology of Guangzhou City, the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the China Agricultural Research System.

The abstract that accompanies this study is avialable here.

The American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, is a not-for-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

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