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Free articles on Aedes albopictus, mosquitoes that may transmit Zika

June 28, 2016

This week is National Mosquito Control Awareness Week, and the Entomological Society of America is supporting the effort with a special collection of articles about the Asian tiger mosquito.

Like its close relative Aedes aegypti, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) has been in the news recently due to its ability to transmit pathogens that cause diseases such as Zika, dengue, and chikungunya. Unlike Aedes aegypti, which is mainly found in areas where the weather is warm year-round, Aedes albopictus can tolerate colder weather, and in the United States it is found as far north as New York and New Jersey. As its name implies, this invasive insect came to North America from Asia in the 1980s and has since become a well-established pest in many areas.

Thirty years after its introduction to North America, Oxford University Press and the Entomological Society of America have released a special collection of articles on the Asian tiger mosquito. The following articles from the Journal of Medical Entomology are freely available to assist researchers, medical professionals, policy makers, and others working on mosquito management:

Thirty Years of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in America: An Introduction to Current Perspectives and Future Challenges
(http://bit.ly/28JOkNi)
Donald A. Yee
Journal of Medical Entomology (2016)

Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and Mosquito-Borne Viruses in the United States
(http://bit.ly/28JWHZK)
Dana L. Vanlandingham, Stephen Higgs, and Yan-Jang S. Huang
Journal of Medical Entomology (2015)

Photoperiodic Diapause and the Establishment of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in North America
(http://bit.ly/28JtNbf)
Peter A. Armbruster
Journal of Medical Entomology (2016)

What Can Larval Ecology Tell Us About the Success of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) Within the United States?
(http://bit.ly/28Loas5)
Donald A. Yee
Journal of Medical Entomology (2016)

The Importance of Interspecific Interactions on the Present Range of the Invasive Mosquito Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and Persistence of Resident Container Species in the United States
(http://bit.ly/28JtSvc)
Joseph E. Fader
Journal of Medical Entomology (2016)

The Eye of the Tiger, the Thrill of the Fight: Effective Larval and Adult Control Measures Against the Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae), in North America
(http://bit.ly/28JgbKs)
Ary Faraji and Isik Unlu
Journal of Medical Entomology (2016)
-end-
The Journal of Medical Entomology is published by the Entomological Society of America, the largest organization in the world serving the professional and scientific needs of entomologists and people in related disciplines. Founded in 1889, ESA today has more than 7,000 members affiliated with educational institutions, health agencies, private industry, and government. Members are researchers, teachers, extension service personnel, administrators, marketing representatives, research technicians, consultants, students, and hobbyists. For more information, visit http://www.entsoc.org.

Entomological Society of America

Related Mosquito Articles:

New gene editing technique could drive out mosquito-borne disease
Scientists at UC Berkeley and UC Riverside have demonstrated a way to edit the genome of disease-carrying mosquitoes that brings us closer to suppressing them on a continental scale.
Traces of Zika Found in Asian tiger mosquito in Brazil
In a recent test of Asian tiger mosquitoes collected in Brazil, researchers found fragments of Zika virus RNA, raising concerns that it may be carried by species other than Zika's known primary vector, the yellow fever mosquito.
Scientists assemble Zika virus mosquito genome from scratch
A team of scientists has developed a new way to sequence genomes, which can assemble the genome of an organism, entirely from scratch, dramatically cheaper and faster.
Scientists use new technology to assemble genome of Zika virus mosquito
A team spanning Baylor College of Medicine, Rice University, Texas Children's Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has developed a new way to sequence genomes, which can assemble the genome of an organism, entirely from scratch, dramatically cheaper and faster.
More mosquito species than previously thought may transmit Zika
Zika virus could be transmitted by more mosquito species than those currently known, according to a new predictive model created by ecologists at the University of Georgia and the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies.
For mosquito repellents, stick with the spray
In a crowded marketplace of products advertised to repel mosquitos, consumers are wise to trust spray-on repellents containing DEET or PMD, say researchers at New Mexico State University.
Researchers create mosquito resistant to dengue virus
Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have genetically modified mosquitoes to resist infection from dengue virus, a virus that sickens an estimated 96 million people globally each year and kills more than 20,000, mostly children.
Malaria transmission may increase when more parasites are transferred via mosquito bite
Mosquitos carrying a greater number of malaria-causing parasites may be more likely to cause infection in the people they bite, according to a new study published in PLOS Pathogens.
Chemical mosquito controls ineffective in Zika fight
Some existing methods for controlling Zika-carrying mosquitoes are not effective and may even be counter-productive, according to research by scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA).
Antibody test gauges mosquito exposure
Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have described a blood test that can be used to assess human exposure to Aedes mosquitos.

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by Verna Aardema (Author), Leo Dillon (Illustrator), Diane Dillon (Illustrator)

Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears: A West African Tale View Details


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Now in paperback--a fascinating work of popular science from a world-renowned expert on mosquitoes and a prize-winning reporter.

In this lively and comprehensive portrait of the mosquito, its role in history, and its threat to mankind, Spielman and D'Antonio take a mosquito's-eye view of nature and man. They show us how mosquitoes breed, live, mate, and die, and introduce us to their enemies, both natural and man-made. The authors present tragic and often grotesque examples of how the mosquito has insinuated itself into human history, from the malaria that devastated... View Details


Mosquitoes
by William Faulkner (Author)

“Full of the kind of swift and lusty writing that comes from a healthy, fresh pen.”―Lillian Hellman, New York Herald Tribune

A delightful surprise, Faulkner’s second novel introduces us to a colorful band of passengers on a boating excursion from New Orleans. This engaging, high-spirited novel―which Faulkner wrote “for the sake of writing because it was fun”―offers a fascinating glimpse of Faulkner as a young artist. View Details


The Mosquito Coast
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In a breathtaking adventure story, the paranoid and brilliant inventor Allie Fox takes his family to live in the Honduran jungle, determined to build a civilization better than the one they've left. Fleeing from an America he sees as mired in materialism and conformity, he hopes to rediscover a purer life. But his utopian experiment takes a dark turn when his obsessions lead the family toward unimaginable danger. View Details


Mosquito: A Natural History of Our Most Persistent and Deadly Foe by Andrew Spielman (2001-06-13)
by Andrew Spielman; Michael D'Antonio (Author)

View Details


Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1620-1914 (New Approaches to the Americas)
by J. R. McNeill (Author)

This book explores the links among ecology, disease, and international politics in the context of the Greater Caribbean - the landscapes lying between Surinam and the Chesapeake - in the seventeenth through early twentieth centuries. Ecological changes made these landscapes especially suitable for the vector mosquitoes of yellow fever and malaria, and these diseases wrought systematic havoc among armies and would-be settlers. Because yellow fever confers immunity on survivors of the disease, and because malaria confers resistance, these diseases played partisan roles in the struggles for... View Details


Mosquito (Bug Books)
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This updated edition asks some great questions. How many kinds of mosquitoes are there? Do mosquitoes suck only human blood? How many wings does a mosquito have? Are you brave enough to find out more about these interesting creatures? How are they born? How do they grow, feed, move, and have babies? Where do they live and what do they look like? What makes mosquitoes special? View Details


The Mosquito Book: An Entertaining, Fact-filled Look at the Dreaded Pesky Bloodsuckers
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This book contains everything you need to understand and avoid mosquitoes, including a review of CDC-recommended repellents and products. View Details


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Bury those easy-to-read Black romance books. Mosquito is where African-American literature is heading as we approach the twenty-first century.--E. Ethelbert Miller, Emerge View Details


Mosquito Trails: Ecology, Health, and the Politics of Entanglement
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Dengue fever is the world’s most prevalent mosquito-borne illness, but Alex Nading argues that people in dengue-endemic communities do not always view humans and mosquitoes as mortal enemies. Drawing on two years of ethnographic research in urban Nicaragua and challenging current global health approaches to animal-borne illness, Mosquito Trails tells the story of a group of community health workers who struggle to come to terms with dengue epidemics amid poverty, political change, and economic upheaval. Blending theory from medical anthropology, political ecology, and science and... View Details

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