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This week from AGU: As climate stirs Arctic sea ice faster, pollution tags along

June 28, 2017

GeoSpace

As climate stirs Arctic sea ice faster, pollution tags along

A warming climate is not just melting the Arctic's sea ice; it is stirring the remaining ice faster, increasing the odds that ice-rafted pollution will foul a neighboring country's waters, according to a new study in Earth's Future.

Eos.org

New volcanic island unveils explosive past


A recent volcanic eruption near Tonga in the southwest Pacific created a new island, giving scientists a rare opportunity to explore the volcanic record of this remote region.

Research Spotlights

Massive waves of melting Greenland ice warped Earth's crust


A novel method described in a new study in Geophysical Research Letters uses shifting bedrock to trace pulses of mass that propagate down a glacier.

How shifting winds turn tropical storms into hurricanes

Researchers present a novel method for analyzing how wind shear affects tropical cyclone strength and structure in a new study in the Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems.

Huge storms disrupted Jupiter's fastest jet stream in 2016

Recurrent jet stream disturbances provide glimpses of what lies beneath the gas giant's thick upper cloud cover, according to a new study in Geophysical Research Letters.
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Related Sea Ice Articles:

Low sea-ice cover in the Arctic
The sea-ice extent in the Arctic is nearing its annual minimum at the end of the melt season in September.
Arctic sea ice 2019 wintertime extent is seventh lowest
Sea ice in the Arctic appears to have hit its annual maximum extent after growing through the fall and winter.
Study shows algae thrive under Greenland sea ice
Microscopic marine plants flourish beneath the ice that covers the Greenland Sea, according to a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans.
ICESat-2 reveals profile of ice sheets, sea ice, forests
With each pass of the ICESat-2 satellite, the mission is adding to datasets tracking Earth's rapidly changing ice.
Arctic cyclone limits the time-scale of precise sea-ice prediction in Northern Sea Route?
Climate change has accelerated sea-ice retreat in the Arctic Ocean, leading to new opportunities for summer commercial maritime navigation along the Northern Sea Route.
Ocean waves following sea ice loss trigger Antarctic ice shelf collapse
Storm-driven ocean swells have triggered the catastrophic disintegration of Antarctic ice shelves in recent decades, according to new research published in Nature today.
New technique more accurately reflects ponds on Arctic sea ice
This one simple mathematical trick can accurately predict the shape and melting effects of ponds on Arctic sea ice, according to new research by UChicago scientists.
Arctic wintertime sea ice extent is among lowest on record
Sea ice in the Arctic grew to its annual maximum extent last week, and joined 2015, 2016 and 2017 as the four lowest maximum extents on record, according to scientists at the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and NASA.
Sea ice algae blooms in the dark
Researchers from Aarhus University have measured a new world record: Small ice algae on the underside of the Arctic sea ice live and grow at a light level corresponding to only 0.02 percent of the light at the surface of the ice.
Weather anomalies accelerate the melting of sea ice
ETH researchers reveal why Arctic sea ice began to melt in the middle of winter two years ago -- and that the increased melting of ice in summer is linked to recurring periods of fair weather.
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