Nav: Home

Visual impairment associated with a decline in cognitive function

June 28, 2018

Bottom Line: Worsening vision and declining cognitive function are common conditions among older people. Understanding the association between them could help reduce age-related cognitive changes. A study of more than 2,500 adults aged 65 and older found rate of worsening vision was associated with rate of declining cognitive function. More importantly, vision has a stronger influence on cognition than the reverse. The study finding suggests maintaining good vision through the prevention and treatment of vision disorders in old persons may be a strategy to lessen age-related cognitive changes.

Authors: D. Diane Zheng, M.S., University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, and coauthors

Related material: The commentary, "Treating the Eyes to Help the Brain," by Paul J. Foster, Ph.D., F.R.C.S., (Ed)., of Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, and coauthors is also available on the For The Media website.

To Learn More: The full study is available on the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2018.2493)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
-end-
Want to embed a link to this study in your story? Link will be live at the embargo time http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2018.2493

JAMA Ophthalmology

Related Vision Articles:

School-based vision screening programs found 1 in 10 kids had vision problems
A school-based vision screening program in kindergarten, shown to be effective at identifying untreated vision problems in 1 in 10 students, could be useful to implement widely in diverse communities, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191085.
Restoring vision by gene therapy
Latest scientific findings give hope for people with incurable retinal degeneration.
Vision loss influences perception of sound
People with severe vision loss can less accurately judge the distance of nearby sounds, potentially putting them more at risk of injury.
'Time is vision' after a stroke
University of Rochester researchers studied stroke patients who experienced vision loss and found that the patients retained some visual abilities immediately after the stroke but these abilities diminished gradually and eventually disappeared permanently after approximately six months.
Improving the vision of self-driving vehicles
There may be a better way for autonomous vehicles to learn how to drive themselves: by watching humans.
A new model of vision
MIT researchers have developed a computer model of face processing that could reveal how the brain produces richly detailed visual representations so quickly.
Vision may be the real cause of children's problems
Do you have poor motor skills or struggle to read, write or solve math problems?
Shark and ray vision comes into focus
Until now, little has been known about the evolution of vision in cartilaginous fishes, particularly sharks and their genetic cousins, the rays.
The birth of vision, from the retina to the brain
How do neurons differentiate to become individual components of the visual system?
Tracing the evolution of vision
The function of the visual photopigment rhodopsin and its action in the retina to facilitate vision is well understood.
More Vision News and Vision Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Kittens Kick The Giggly Blue Robot All Summer
With the recent passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, there's been a lot of debate about how much power the Supreme Court should really have. We think of the Supreme Court justices as all-powerful beings, issuing momentous rulings from on high. But they haven't always been so, you know, supreme. On this episode, we go all the way back to the case that, in a lot of ways, started it all.  Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.