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Visual impairment associated with a decline in cognitive function

June 28, 2018

Bottom Line: Worsening vision and declining cognitive function are common conditions among older people. Understanding the association between them could help reduce age-related cognitive changes. A study of more than 2,500 adults aged 65 and older found rate of worsening vision was associated with rate of declining cognitive function. More importantly, vision has a stronger influence on cognition than the reverse. The study finding suggests maintaining good vision through the prevention and treatment of vision disorders in old persons may be a strategy to lessen age-related cognitive changes.

Authors: D. Diane Zheng, M.S., University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, and coauthors

Related material: The commentary, "Treating the Eyes to Help the Brain," by Paul J. Foster, Ph.D., F.R.C.S., (Ed)., of Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, and coauthors is also available on the For The Media website.

To Learn More: The full study is available on the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2018.2493)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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JAMA Ophthalmology

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