Exploring how the body adapts to exercise at altitude-hypoxia affects muscle and nerve responses

June 29, 2009

New Rochelle, NY, June 29, 2009--Exercise requires the integrated activity of every organ and tissue in the body, and understanding how these respond to the decreased oxygen levels present at moderate to high altitude is the focus of the current special issue of High Altitude Medicine & Biology, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. (www.liebertpub.com). The entire issue is available free online at www.liebertpub.com/ham Guest Editor Peter D. Wagner, MD, Distinguished Professor of Medicine & Bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego, presents six review articles written by expert researchers in the field of high altitude medicine that explore various aspects of exercise at altitude, including muscle and nerve function, metabolic responses, and changes that occur at the cellular level.

Hypoxia, or reduced blood oxygen levels, represents a threat to the body, explains Dr. Wagner. "These threats are countered by immediate physiological responses and also by longer term adaptive responses...to enhance both O2 transport and exercise capacity," he writes in an editorial introducing this special issue.

In the review entitled, "Air to Muscle O2 Delivery during Exercise at Altitude," José Calbet, from the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain), and Carsten Lundby, from Arhus University (Denmark), propose that humans maintain a functional reserve of oxygen in the muscles that they can draw on during exercising in hypoxia. Philo Saunders, David Pyne, and Christopher Gore, from the Australian Institute of Sport (Canberra), focus on the potential benefits athletes might achieve by training at moderate altitude in, "Endurance Training at Altitude." The implications of reduced oxygen for the human nervous system are the topic of an article by Markus Amann, from the University of Zurich and the University of Utah, and Bengt Kayser, from the University of Geneva, titled, "Nervous System Function during Exercise in Hypoxia."

How hypoxia brings about changes in the proteins expressed by muscle cells to help them adapt to lower oxygen availability is explored in two reviews: "Muscle Bioenergetics and Metabolic Control at Altitude," by Paolo Cerretelli, Mauro Marzorati, and Claudio Marconi, from the National Research Council, Milan, Italy, and, "Plasticity of the Muscle Proteome to Exercise at Altitude," by Martin Flueck, from Manchester Metropolitan University (UK). Hypoxia also affects the ability of muscles to contract, as Stéphane Perrey and Thomas Rupp, from the University of Montpellier (France), explain in, "Altitude-Induced Changes in Muscle Contractile Properties."
-end-


High Altitude Medicine & Biology
is an authoritative, peer-reviewed journal published quarterly online. It is the only peer-reviewed journal dedicated exclusively to the latest advances in high altitude life sciences. The Journal presents findings on the effects of chronic hypoxia on lung and heart disease, pulmonary and cerebral edema, hypertension, dehydration, infertility, appetite and weight loss, and other diseases. A complete table of contents and full text for this issue may be viewed online at www.liebertpub.com/ham

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. (www.liebertpub.com) is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery and Pediatric Asthma, Allergy & Immunology. Its biotechnology trade magazine, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 60 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available at www.liebertpub.com

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Related Muscle Articles from Brightsurf:

Muscle aging: Stronger for longer
With life expectancy increasing, age-related diseases are also on the rise, including sarcopenia, the loss of muscle mass due to aging.

Duchenne: "Crosstalk" between muscle and spleen
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common muscle disease in children and is passed on by X-linked recessive inheritance.

Fantastic muscle proteins and where to find them
Setting out to identify all proteins that make up the sarcomere, the basic contractile unit of muscle cells, resulted in an unexpected revelation, providing experimental evidence that helps explain a fundamental mystery about how muscles work.

Strong change of course for muscle research
Scientists have discovered a new subtype of muscle stem cells.

Electronics integrated to the muscle via 'Kirigami'
A research team in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a donut-shaped kirigami device for electromyography (EMG) recordings.

Link between gut microbes & muscle growth suggests future approach to tackle muscle loss
Scientists led by NTU Singapore's Professor Sven Pettersson established a link between gut microbes and muscle growth and function -- a finding that could open new doors to interventions for age-related skeletal muscle loss.

What is known -- and not known -- about heart muscle diseases in children
Cardiomyopathies (heart muscle diseases) in children are the focus of a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association that provides insight into the diagnosis and treatment of the diseases as well as identifying future research priorities.

Chloride-channel in muscle cells provides new insights for muscle diseases
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have mapped the structure of an important channel in human muscle cells.

How do muscle and tendon connections last a lifetime?
Muscles are connected to tendons to power animal movements such as running, swimming or flying.

Oscillation in muscle tissue
When a muscle grows or a muscle injury heals, some of the stem cells develop into new muscle cells.

Read More: Muscle News and Muscle Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.