Flies avoid a plant's poison using a newly identified taste mechanism

June 29, 2009

Many plants protect themselves from hungry animals by producing toxic chemicals. In turn, animals rely on detecting the presence of these harmful chemicals to avoid consuming dangerous plant material. A paper, published in this week's issue of PLoS Biology, investigates the response of an insect to a common plant weapon - the toxin L-canavanine. The work, from authors at the Institute of Functional Genomic of Montpellier, finds that the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster can recognize L-canavanine and identifies the cellular receptor that facilitates this recognition. Surprisingly, the receptor that identifies L-canavanine is not from the gustatory receptor family responsible for all known taste sensation in insects - instead it is a modified glutamate receptor, called DmXR.

When fruit flies were forced to consume L-canavanine they subsequently failed to reproduce - all of the offspring died as larvae - thus showing an evolutionary advantage to evolving a mechanism to sense and avoid consuming the toxin. The work - lead by Yves Grau - demonstrated that the mechanism is based on DmXR. First the authors showed that human cells modified to express DmXR would respond to L-canavanine, whereas unmodified cells did not respond. Next, they demonstrated that fruit flies have the ability to modify their behavior when exposed to L-canavanine: when offered two sugar solutions the flies avoided the one spiked with L-canavanine. Genetically modified Drosophila which had the DmXR receptor disabled showed no such preference, again indicating the key role of the receptor in the tasting of this toxin. By observing Drosophila behaviour, the authors found that the application of L-canavanine to the flies legs (where the taste receptors are) caused them to retract their mouthparts - thereby avoiding consuming the poison.

Understanding sensations in insects is not just of scientific interest - given that many insects are pests and vectors for disease, identifying chemicals that are insect-specific and the pathways that are involved may provide alternatives to insecticide use in the future.
-end-
Funding: This work was supported by fellowships from the Ministere de la Recherche and the Fondation pour la Recherche Medicale to CM, a Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) postdoctoral fellowship to LS, by the ANR grant DROSDYN to MLP and by grants from the CNRS and Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) to the Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle. The small animal imaging core facility (http://ipam.igf.cnrs.fr/) was supported by grants from the National Biophotonics and Imaging Platform (Ireland), Réseau National des Genopoles, Institut Fede ratif de Recherche 3 (IFR3), and Région Languedoc Roussillon. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Citation: Mitri C, Soustelle L, Framery B, Bockaert J, Parmentier M-L, et al. (2009) Plant Insecticide L-Canavanine Repels Drosophila via the Insect Orphan GPCR DmX. PLoS Biol 7(6): e1000147. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000147

PLEASE ADD THE LINK TO THE PUBLISHED ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT: http://biology.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371/journal.pbio.1000147

PRESS ONLY PREVIEW OF THE ARTICLE: http://www.plos.org/press/plbi-07-06-Grau.pdf

PRESS ONLY PREVIEW OF THE RELATED SYNOPSIS ARTICLE: http://www.plos.org/press/plbi-07-06-Grausynopsis.pdf

CONTACT
Yves Grau
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle
141 rue de la cardonille
MONTPELLIER, 34094
France
yves.grau@igf.cnrs.fr

PLOS

Related Fruit Flies Articles from Brightsurf:

Sestrin makes fruit flies live longer
Researchers identify positive effector behind reduced food intake.

Circular RNA makes fruit flies live longer
The molecule influences the insulin signalling pathway and thus prolongs life

Fruit flies respond to rapid changes in the visual environment
Researchers have discovered a mechanism employed by the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster that broadens our understanding of visual perception.

How fruit flies flock together in orderly clusters
Opposing desires to congregate and maintain some personal space drive fruit flies to form orderly clusters, according to a study published today in eLife.

Fruit flies help in the development of personalized medicine
It is common knowledge that there is a connection between our genes and the risk of developing certain diseases.

Fruit flies' microbiomes shape their evolution
In just five generations, an altered microbiome can lead to genome-wide evolution in fruit flies, according to new research led researchers at the University of Pennsylvania.

Why fruit flies eat practically anything
Kyoto University researchers uncover why some organisms can eat anything -- 'generalists -- and others have strict diets -- 'specialists'.

Why so fly: MU scientists discover some fruit flies learn better than others
Fruit flies could one day provide new avenues to discover additional genes that contribute to a person's ability to learn and remember.

Fruit flies find their way by setting navigational goals
Navigating fruit flies do not have the luxury of GPS, but they do have a kind of neural compass.

Tolerance to stress is a 'trade-off' as fruit flies age
With the help of the common fruit fly (D. melanogaster), which ages quickly because it only lives about 60 days, FAU neuroscientists provide insights into healthy aging by investigating the effects of a foraging gene on age and stress tolerance.

Read More: Fruit Flies News and Fruit Flies Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.