Heat-shock protein vaccine reduces alveolar bone loss

June 30, 2006

Heat-shock protein (HSP) can be utilized as a vaccine to cross-protect against multiple pathogenic species. Investigators from Pusan National University (South Korea) today presented the findings of a study they performed to evaluate the bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis heat-shock protein (HSP) 60 as a vaccine candidate to inhibit multiple bacteria-induced alveolar bone loss. Recombinant P. gingivalis HSP60 was produced and purified from P. gingivalis GroEL gene. Rats were immunized with P. gingivalis HSP60, and experimental alveolar bone loss was induced by infection with multiple periodontopathogenic bacteria.

There was a very strong inverse relationship between post-immune anti-P. gingivalis HSP immunoglobulin G levels and the amount of alveolar bone loss induced by either P. gingivalis or multiple bacterial infection (p = 0.007). Analysis of data from polymerase chain-reaction indicated that the vaccine successfully eradicated the multiple pathogenic species.

The researchers concluded that P. gingivalis HSP60 could potentially be developed as a vaccine to inhibit periodontal disease induced by multiple pathogenic bacteria.
-end-
This is a summary of abstract #2391, "Porphyromonas gingivalis HSP Vaccine Reduces Alveolar Bone Loss," by J.-I. Choi, J.-Y. Lee, S.-J. Kim, and N.N.-Yi, of Pusan National University, South Korea, to be presented at 3:30 p.m. on Friday, June 30, 2006, in Exhibit Hall 1 of the Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre, during the 84th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research.

International & American Associations for Dental Research

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