Nav: Home

A revolutionary new treatment alternative to corneal transplantation

June 30, 2020

The team was co-led by May Griffith, a researcher at Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre, which is affiliated with Université de Montréal and is part of the CIUSSS de l'Est-de-l'Île-de-Montréal.

The results of this multinational project have just been published in the journal Science Advances.

"Our work has led to an effective and accessible solution called LiQD Cornea to treat corneal perforations without the need for transplantation," said Griffith. She is also a full professor in the Department of Ophthalmology at Université de Montréal.

"This is good news for the many patients who are unable to undergo this operation due to a severe worldwide shortage of donor corneas," she said.

"Until now, patients on the waiting list have had their perforated corneas sealed with a medical-grade super glue, but this is only a short-term solution because it is often poorly tolerated in the eye, making transplantation necessary."

A synthetic, biocompatible and adhesive liquid hydrogel, LiQD Cornea, is applied as a liquid, but quickly adheres and gels within the corneal tissue. The LiQD Cornea promotes tissue regeneration, thus treating corneal perforations without the need for transplantation.

Griffith praised the work of her trainees, Christopher McTiernan and Fiona Simpson, and her collaborators from around the world who have helped create a potentially revolutionary treatment to help people with vision loss avoid going blind.

"Vision is the sense that allows us to appreciate how the world around us looks," said Griffith. "Allowing patients to retain this precious asset is what motivates our actions as researchers every day of the week."

For Sylvain Lemieux, president and CEO of the CIUSSS de l'Est-de-l'Île-de-Montréal, "this innovative treatment in ophthalmology confirms the level of expertise of the Centre universitaire d'ophtalmologie de l'Université de Montréal (CUO) at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital (HMR).

"The HMR has one of the largest teams of ophthalmologists in Quebec and one of the best-equipped ophthalmology research laboratories in North America," he said. "The hard work of our scientists and clinicians contributes daily to best practices and knowledge development.

"The multiple therapeutic possibilities resulting from our fundamental research, particularly in regenerative medicine, benefit and give hope to people suffering from ophthalmological diseases not only in Quebec, but in the rest of the world," he concluded.
-end-
The development of LiQD Cornea was supported by research grants from Euronanomedicine II - Swedish Research Council, Euronanomed III - FRQS and the Réseau de recherche en santé de la vision du Québec. UdeM-HMR trainees were supported by the Caroline Durand Foundation and support from the Dept. of Ophthalmology, UdeM, FRQNT and NSERC.

About May Griffith

Holder of a PhD in cell biology, May Griffith is director of the Corneal Regeneration and Biomaterials unit at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre. She is full professor in the Department of Ophthalmology at Université de Montréal (UdeM), and is affiliated with the UdeM Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM). Dr. Griffith holds the Caroline Durand Foundation Chair in Cellular Therapy of Eye Diseases at UdeM, as well as the Canada Research Chair in Biomaterials and Stem Cells in Ophthalmology (Tier 1).

About the CIUSSS de l'Est-de l'Île-de-Montréal

The Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux de l'Est-de-l'Île-de-Montréal (CIUSSS-Est) includes Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, Santa Cabrini Hospital, the Canadian-Polish Welfare Institute, the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal, and the Saint-Léonard, Saint-Michel, Pointe-de-l'Île, and Lucille-Teasdale Health and Social Service Centres (CSSSs). Affiliated with Université de Montréal, the CIUSSS-Est combines the missions of teaching, assessment, and research of doctors and health professionals with excellence in health care delivery.

University of Montreal

Related Transplantation Articles:

A revolutionary new treatment alternative to corneal transplantation
A new approach in ophthalmology that offers a revolutionary alternative to corneal transplantation has just been developed by researchers and clinicians in North America, Europe, and Oceania.
Fewer complications after organ transplantation
A large international study coordinated by University Hospital Regensburg and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin has demonstrated the safety of new cell therapy approaches for use in kidney transplant recipients.
Elderly patients also benefit from kidney transplantation
So far, kidney transplantation has generally not been offered to elderly patients (>75 years) because of the perioperative risks.
New material will allow abandoning bone marrow transplantation
Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS' developed nanomaterial, which will be able to restore the internal structure of bones damaged due to osteoporosis and osteomyelitis.
Fewer medical tests -- timely listing for transplantation
Younger patients would benefit greatly from kidney transplantation. Their expected remaining lifetime may even be doubled by having a transplant.
Uterus transplantation -- ethically just as problematic as altruistic surrogacy
In 2014, the first child to have been gestated in a donated uterus was born.
Advancing transplantation: Hepatitis C-infected organs safe for transplantation when followed by antiviral treatment
Twenty patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease, according to a study published today in Annals of Internal Medicine.
Transplantation followed by antiviral therapy cured hepatitis C
Twenty patients who received kidneys transplanted from hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected donors experienced HCV cure, good quality of life, and excellent renal function at one year.
The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation: 50 years of heart transplantation progress
This month marks the 50th anniversary of the world's first human heart transplant performed at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town by South African surgeon, Christiaan Barnard.
Older donor lungs should be considered for transplantation
With a scarcity of lungs available for transplantation, the use of lungs from donors older than age 60 has been shown to achieve reasonable outcomes and should be considered as a viable option, according to research published online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.
More Transplantation News and Transplantation Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Debbie Millman: Designing Our Lives
From prehistoric cave art to today's social media feeds, to design is to be human. This hour, designer Debbie Millman guides us through a world made and remade–and helps us design our own paths.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#574 State of the Heart
This week we focus on heart disease, heart failure, what blood pressure is and why it's bad when it's high. Host Rachelle Saunders talks with physician, clinical researcher, and writer Haider Warraich about his book "State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science, and Future of Cardiac Disease" and the ails of our hearts.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Insomnia Line
Coronasomnia is a not-so-surprising side-effect of the global pandemic. More and more of us are having trouble falling asleep. We wanted to find a way to get inside that nighttime world, to see why people are awake and what they are thinking about. So what'd Radiolab decide to do?  Open up the phone lines and talk to you. We created an insomnia hotline and on this week's experimental episode, we stayed up all night, taking hundreds of calls, spilling secrets, and at long last, watching the sunrise peek through.   This episode was produced by Lulu Miller with Rachael Cusick, Tracie Hunte, Tobin Low, Sarah Qari, Molly Webster, Pat Walters, Shima Oliaee, and Jonny Moens. Want more Radiolab in your life? Sign up for our newsletter! We share our latest favorites: articles, tv shows, funny Youtube videos, chocolate chip cookie recipes, and more. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.