Nav: Home

To support lactating emergency physicians, consider these strategies

June 30, 2020

ANN ARBOR, Mich. - In a new paper, published in Annals of Emergency Medicine, three female emergency physicians share the need for emergency departments to adopt best practices and strategies to support lactating emergency physicians.

"In the often hectic and unpredictable emergency department environment, lactating physicians can find it challenging to have set breaks to pump," says Mary Haas, M.D., an instructor in emergency medicine at Michigan Medicine and the lead author of the paper.

Haas and her colleagues note that a lack of support in the workplace, including lack of appropriate lactation spaces and departmental policies, can impair an emergency physicians' ability to meet lactation goals and lead to early cessation of breastfeeding.

The authors call for three broad categories of strategies -- time, space and support -- including tactics within each, that lactating physicians, their colleagues and departmental leadership can implement. For example, in the time category, the authors note that lactating physicians should set telephone reminders to pump, colleagues can recognize the need for lactating physicians to pump every three hours and departmental leadership can allow flexibility in clinical scheduling.

"It truly 'takes a village' to support lactating mothers," Haas says. "We hope this paper showcases the need for all parties in emergency medicine to be involved and supportive of our lactating colleagues."
-end-


Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Related Emergency Medicine Articles:

Graduates of family medicine residencies are likely to enter and remain in family medicine
This study provides an overview of the characteristics of physicians who completed family medicine residency training from 1994 to 2017.
To support lactating emergency physicians, consider these strategies
A new paper highlights strategies that emergency departments can implement to support lactating emergency physicians.
Nuclear medicine and COVID-19: New content from The Journal of Nuclear Medicine
In one of five new COVID-19-related articles and commentaries published in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Johnese Spisso discusses how the UCLA Hospital System has dealt with the pandemic.
Use of emergency departments plummets during COVID-19
A new commentary highlights the dramatic decline in emergency department visits during the COVID-19 pandemic and what could be causing the decrease.
Why is appendicitis not always diagnosed in the emergency department?
A new study examines the factors associated with a potentially missed diagnosis of appendicitis in children and adults in the emergency department.
NUS Medicine researchers can reprogramme cells to original state for regenerative medicine
Scientists from NUS Medicine have found a way to induce totipotency in embryonic cells that have already matured into pluripotency.
The cost of waiting in emergency departments
Wait times in US emergency departments are increasing. A new study published in Economic Inquiry indicates that prolonging the wait time in the emergency department for a patient who arrives with a serious condition by 10 minutes will increase the hospital's cost to care for the patient by an average of 6%, and it will increase the cost to care for moderately severe cases by an average of 3%.
Emergency medicine: Department-based intensive care unit improves patient survival rates
A new Michigan Medicine study found that implementing a dedicated emergency medicine department-based intensive care unit improved patient survival rates and lowered inpatient intensive care unit (ICU) admissions.
Emergency room or doctor's office?
A new study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier, examines the relationship between the way individuals perceive and respond to threats (threat sensitivity) and where they most frequently seek medical care.
Gender-based salary gap persists among academic emergency medicine physicians
Although overall salaries for emergency physicians have increased over the past four years, and despite a call to end gender disparities in salary, men still make 18 percent more than women, and a $12,000 gender salary gap remains essentially unchanged.
More Emergency Medicine News and Emergency Medicine Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Warped Reality
False information on the internet makes it harder and harder to know what's true, and the consequences have been devastating. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around technology and deception. Guests include law professor Danielle Citron, journalist Andrew Marantz, and computer scientist Joy Buolamwini.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

How to Win Friends and Influence Baboons
Baboon troops. We all know they're hierarchical. There's the big brutish alpha male who rules with a hairy iron fist, and then there's everybody else. Which is what Meg Crofoot thought too, before she used GPS collars to track the movements of a troop of baboons for a whole month. What she and her team learned from this data gave them a whole new understanding of baboon troop dynamics, and, moment to moment, who really has the power.  This episode was reported and produced by Annie McEwen. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.